Experimental comparisons of face-to-face and anonymous real-time team competition in a networked gaming learning environment

Fu Yun Yu, Chialing Han, Tak Wai Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigates the impact of anonymous, computerized, synchronized team competition on students' motivation, satisfaction, and interpersonal relationships. Sixty-eight fourth-graders participated in this study. A synchronous gaming learning system was developed to have dyads compete against each other in answering multiple-choice questions set in accordance with the school curriculum in two conditions (face-to-face and anonymous). The results showed that students who were exposed to the anonymous team competition condition responded significantly more positively than those in the face-to-face condition in terms of motivation and satisfaction at the 0.050 and 0.056 levels respectively. Although further studies regarding the effects of anonymous interaction in a networked gaming learning environment are imperative, the positive effects detected in this preliminary study indicate that anonymity is a viable feature for mitigating the negative effects that competition may inflict on motivation and satisfaction as reported in traditional face-to-face environments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)511-514
Number of pages4
JournalCyberpsychology and Behavior
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Aug 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Applied Psychology
  • Human-Computer Interaction

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