Exploring bioaugmentation strategies for azo-dye decolorization using a mixed consortium of Pseudomonas luteola and Escherichia coli

Bor Yann Chen, Shan Yu Chen, Meng Yi Lin, Jo-Shu Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, replacement-series method and contour analysis were applied to investigate optimal bioaugmentation strategies for the treatment of a dye-contaminated aquatic system using a constructed mixed-community for biodecolorization of a model azo dye Reactive Red 22. The novelty emphasizes that a species without essential target functions in a mixed culture could still play a crucial role in influencing the treatment performance. That is, although non-decolorizers (i.e., Escherichia coli DH5α) were considered metabolically "dormant" in this model binary-biosystem, their presence still significantly enhanced decolorization performance of the decolorizers (i.e., Pseudomonas luteola). In aerobic growth conditions, E. coli DH5α possessed a growth advantage to out-compete P. luteola due to preferential growth rate of DH5α. However, in static decolorization conditions, DH5α seemed to produce decolorization-stimulating extracellular metabolites to help the major decolorizer (P. luteola) decompose the toxic pollutant (i.e., the azo dye) in a short term for the benefit of total survival in the environment. The experimental results show that the presence of E. coli DH5α increased the decolorization efficiency of P. luteola even though DH5α was an inefficient decolorizer in this microbial community. Thus, addition of DH5α into a mixed culture containing P. luteoa as a major decolorizer may lead to a bioaugmentation effect on decolorization activity. The optimal population ratio for bioaugmentation was determined by the contour analysis. The results indicate that the optimal community species ecology for maximum overall decolorization rate almost maintained at a ratio of one viable P. luteola (0.78 × 109 cells/mL) to one DH5α cell (0.70 × 109 cells/mL), representing a maximal diversity (i.e., Hmax ≅ 1.0).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1574-1581
Number of pages8
JournalProcess Biochemistry
Volume41
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Jul 1

Fingerprint

Azo Compounds
Azo dyes
Pseudomonas
Escherichia coli
Growth
Poisons
Ecology
Metabolites
Coloring Agents
Dyes
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Biochemistry
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

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abstract = "In this study, replacement-series method and contour analysis were applied to investigate optimal bioaugmentation strategies for the treatment of a dye-contaminated aquatic system using a constructed mixed-community for biodecolorization of a model azo dye Reactive Red 22. The novelty emphasizes that a species without essential target functions in a mixed culture could still play a crucial role in influencing the treatment performance. That is, although non-decolorizers (i.e., Escherichia coli DH5α) were considered metabolically {"}dormant{"} in this model binary-biosystem, their presence still significantly enhanced decolorization performance of the decolorizers (i.e., Pseudomonas luteola). In aerobic growth conditions, E. coli DH5α possessed a growth advantage to out-compete P. luteola due to preferential growth rate of DH5α. However, in static decolorization conditions, DH5α seemed to produce decolorization-stimulating extracellular metabolites to help the major decolorizer (P. luteola) decompose the toxic pollutant (i.e., the azo dye) in a short term for the benefit of total survival in the environment. The experimental results show that the presence of E. coli DH5α increased the decolorization efficiency of P. luteola even though DH5α was an inefficient decolorizer in this microbial community. Thus, addition of DH5α into a mixed culture containing P. luteoa as a major decolorizer may lead to a bioaugmentation effect on decolorization activity. The optimal population ratio for bioaugmentation was determined by the contour analysis. The results indicate that the optimal community species ecology for maximum overall decolorization rate almost maintained at a ratio of one viable P. luteola (0.78 × 109 cells/mL) to one DH5α cell (0.70 × 109 cells/mL), representing a maximal diversity (i.e., Hmax ≅ 1.0).",
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Exploring bioaugmentation strategies for azo-dye decolorization using a mixed consortium of Pseudomonas luteola and Escherichia coli. / Chen, Bor Yann; Chen, Shan Yu; Lin, Meng Yi; Chang, Jo-Shu.

In: Process Biochemistry, Vol. 41, No. 7, 01.07.2006, p. 1574-1581.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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