Exploring the Correlates of Individual Willingness to Engage in Ideologically Motivated Cyberattacks

Thomas J. Holt, Max Kilger, Li-Chun Chiang, Chu-Sing Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the last few years, there has been an increase in the use of Web defacements, where individuals post political or ideological messages on websites in place of the original content. There is generally little research on the predictors of Web defacements against either domestic or foreign targets. This study addresses this gap by examining the attitudinal and behavioral correlates of willingness to engage in defacements using a sample of university students in Taiwan and the United States. The findings demonstrate that political attitudes toward marginalized groups and support for cybercrime increase individuals’ willingness to engage in defacements.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)356-373
Number of pages18
JournalDeviant Behavior
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Mar 4

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Taiwan
Students
political attitude
Research
website
university
Group
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Cite this

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Exploring the Correlates of Individual Willingness to Engage in Ideologically Motivated Cyberattacks. / Holt, Thomas J.; Kilger, Max; Chiang, Li-Chun; Yang, Chu-Sing.

In: Deviant Behavior, Vol. 38, No. 3, 04.03.2017, p. 356-373.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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