Fabrication and characterization of SiC nanostructured/nanocomposite films

Chen-Kuei Chung, Bo Hsiung Wu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Compared with silicon (Si), silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor with superior physical and chemical properties and is recognized as one of the most promising materials for applications in high-power and high-temperature semiconductor devices [1,2] and severe, hard biomaterials [1-3]. The superior material properties include high strength, high thermal conductivity, high temperature stability, high refractive index, low thermal expansion, low density, variable wide bandgap, and chemical inertness [3]. In terms of physical properties of semiconductor electronics, crystalline SiC exhibits a larger bandgap (2.3-3.4 eV), a higher breakdown field (30 × 105 V/cm), a higher thermal conductivity (3.2-4.9 W/cm K), and a higher saturation velocity (2 × 107 cm/s) than Si [4]. In terms of mechanical properties, SiC specifically exhibits excellent hardness and wear resistance, among others. The Knoop hardness of SiC is about 2480 kg/mm2, which is comparable to that of other hard materials such as diamond (7000 kg/mm2) and Al2O3 (2100 kg/mm2), and is much higher than that of Si (850 kg/mm2) [5]. The wear resistance value of SiC is 9.15 comparable with that of diamond, which is 10, and Al2O3, which is 9.00 [6]. Also, SiC has a high Young’s modulus of 700 GPa, about 3.5 times higher than that of Si [5]. In terms of chemical properties, SiC is resistant to most acids, but can be etched by alkaline hydroxide bases at melting temperatures (>600°C). Note that SiC does not melt, but sublimes above 1800°C (Si melts at 1410°C). The SiC surface can be passivated by the formation of a thermal SiO2 layer, but the oxidation rate is very slow compared to Si [1]. Combining its excellent mechanical properties and high temperature stability, SiC offers new possibilities for developing more challenging applications of MEMS devices than those possible with Si [1,7-9].

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNanostructured Thin Films and Coatings
Subtitle of host publicationFunctional Properties
PublisherCRC Press
Pages49-74
Number of pages26
ISBN (Electronic)9781420093971
ISBN (Print)9781420093957
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Nanocomposite films
Silicon carbide
Silicon
Fabrication
Diamond
Energy gap
Chemical properties
Wear resistance
Diamonds
Thermal conductivity
Physical properties
Hardness
silicon carbide
Semiconductor materials
Mechanical properties
Biocompatible Materials
Semiconductor devices
Biomaterials
Temperature
MEMS

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Chung, C-K., & Wu, B. H. (2010). Fabrication and characterization of SiC nanostructured/nanocomposite films. In Nanostructured Thin Films and Coatings: Functional Properties (pp. 49-74). CRC Press.
Chung, Chen-Kuei ; Wu, Bo Hsiung. / Fabrication and characterization of SiC nanostructured/nanocomposite films. Nanostructured Thin Films and Coatings: Functional Properties. CRC Press, 2010. pp. 49-74
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Chung, C-K & Wu, BH 2010, Fabrication and characterization of SiC nanostructured/nanocomposite films. in Nanostructured Thin Films and Coatings: Functional Properties. CRC Press, pp. 49-74.

Fabrication and characterization of SiC nanostructured/nanocomposite films. / Chung, Chen-Kuei; Wu, Bo Hsiung.

Nanostructured Thin Films and Coatings: Functional Properties. CRC Press, 2010. p. 49-74.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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N2 - Compared with silicon (Si), silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor with superior physical and chemical properties and is recognized as one of the most promising materials for applications in high-power and high-temperature semiconductor devices [1,2] and severe, hard biomaterials [1-3]. The superior material properties include high strength, high thermal conductivity, high temperature stability, high refractive index, low thermal expansion, low density, variable wide bandgap, and chemical inertness [3]. In terms of physical properties of semiconductor electronics, crystalline SiC exhibits a larger bandgap (2.3-3.4 eV), a higher breakdown field (30 × 105 V/cm), a higher thermal conductivity (3.2-4.9 W/cm K), and a higher saturation velocity (2 × 107 cm/s) than Si [4]. In terms of mechanical properties, SiC specifically exhibits excellent hardness and wear resistance, among others. The Knoop hardness of SiC is about 2480 kg/mm2, which is comparable to that of other hard materials such as diamond (7000 kg/mm2) and Al2O3 (2100 kg/mm2), and is much higher than that of Si (850 kg/mm2) [5]. The wear resistance value of SiC is 9.15 comparable with that of diamond, which is 10, and Al2O3, which is 9.00 [6]. Also, SiC has a high Young’s modulus of 700 GPa, about 3.5 times higher than that of Si [5]. In terms of chemical properties, SiC is resistant to most acids, but can be etched by alkaline hydroxide bases at melting temperatures (>600°C). Note that SiC does not melt, but sublimes above 1800°C (Si melts at 1410°C). The SiC surface can be passivated by the formation of a thermal SiO2 layer, but the oxidation rate is very slow compared to Si [1]. Combining its excellent mechanical properties and high temperature stability, SiC offers new possibilities for developing more challenging applications of MEMS devices than those possible with Si [1,7-9].

AB - Compared with silicon (Si), silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor with superior physical and chemical properties and is recognized as one of the most promising materials for applications in high-power and high-temperature semiconductor devices [1,2] and severe, hard biomaterials [1-3]. The superior material properties include high strength, high thermal conductivity, high temperature stability, high refractive index, low thermal expansion, low density, variable wide bandgap, and chemical inertness [3]. In terms of physical properties of semiconductor electronics, crystalline SiC exhibits a larger bandgap (2.3-3.4 eV), a higher breakdown field (30 × 105 V/cm), a higher thermal conductivity (3.2-4.9 W/cm K), and a higher saturation velocity (2 × 107 cm/s) than Si [4]. In terms of mechanical properties, SiC specifically exhibits excellent hardness and wear resistance, among others. The Knoop hardness of SiC is about 2480 kg/mm2, which is comparable to that of other hard materials such as diamond (7000 kg/mm2) and Al2O3 (2100 kg/mm2), and is much higher than that of Si (850 kg/mm2) [5]. The wear resistance value of SiC is 9.15 comparable with that of diamond, which is 10, and Al2O3, which is 9.00 [6]. Also, SiC has a high Young’s modulus of 700 GPa, about 3.5 times higher than that of Si [5]. In terms of chemical properties, SiC is resistant to most acids, but can be etched by alkaline hydroxide bases at melting temperatures (>600°C). Note that SiC does not melt, but sublimes above 1800°C (Si melts at 1410°C). The SiC surface can be passivated by the formation of a thermal SiO2 layer, but the oxidation rate is very slow compared to Si [1]. Combining its excellent mechanical properties and high temperature stability, SiC offers new possibilities for developing more challenging applications of MEMS devices than those possible with Si [1,7-9].

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Chung C-K, Wu BH. Fabrication and characterization of SiC nanostructured/nanocomposite films. In Nanostructured Thin Films and Coatings: Functional Properties. CRC Press. 2010. p. 49-74