From childhood victimization to internalizing and externalizing behavior problems through self-esteem in adolescence

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we aimed to determine whether forms of victimization influence internalizing and externalizing behavior problems differently and whether these relationships are mediated by self-esteem. This study included 2321 Taiwanese adolescents aged 11−21 from a previous case-control study. Six forms of victimization, self-esteem, and seven behaviors were measured. Gender, age, group (justice-involved vs. high-school adolescents), and family dysfunction were covariates in generalized linear models and path analysis. Different forms of childhood victimization were associated with different internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. Additionally, psychological abuse and psychological neglect were negatively associated with self-esteem, which itself was associated with all internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. Significant indirect effects of psychological abuse and psychological neglect on all internalizing and externalizing behavior problems (mediated by self-esteem) were also identified. Due to the limitation of measurement, the interpretation about the influence of victimization patterns could not be made. Findings suggest that different forms of childhood victimization may lead to different mechanisms for internalizing and externalizing behavior problems in adolescents. Further research is needed to identify the mechanisms underlying different forms of childhood victimization and to clarify the effects of victimization patterns to develop effective interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)931-944
Number of pages14
JournalResearch in Nursing and Health
Volume44
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Dec

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Nursing

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