Gastric Helicobacter pylori infection associated with risk of diabetes mellitus, but not prediabetes

Gi Hua Yang, Jin-Shang Wu, Yi-Ching Yang, Ying Hsiang Huang, Feng-Hwa Lu, Chih-Jen Chang

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Abstract

Backgrounds and Aim: The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and diabetes was inconsistent in previous studies. Moreover, there are no studies on the relationship between H.pylori infection and prediabetes in the literature. The aim of this study is thus to assess the association of Helicobacter infection, diagnosed by pathology from gastric biopsy, with diabetes and prediabetes. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 1285 subjects aged 19-85 who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and gastric biopsy during health examinations at National Cheng Kung University Hospital from 2000 to 2009. Subjects were divided into three groups, including normal glucose tolerance, prediabetes, and diabetes. Diabetes and prediabetes were assessed according to the American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria. Gastric Helicobacter infection was an independent variable. Chi-square tests, analysis of variance, and multinomial logistic regression models were used to analyze the effects of Helicobacter infection on the risk of diabetes and prediabetes while controlling for age, lifestyle, pathological conditions, and laboratory variables. Results: There were significant differences in the prevalence of gastric Helicobacter infection among the three groups. The results of multivariate analysis showed that age, obesity, family history of diabetes, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia were significantly related to both prediabetes and diabetes. Helicobacter pylori infection was positively associated with diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-2.01), but not prediabetes (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.77-1.36), in addition to male gender, education level (≤9 vs >12 years), pre-hypertension, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusions: Gastric H.pylori infection is associated with diabetes, but not prediabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1794-1799
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia)
Volume29
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Oct 1

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Prediabetic State
Helicobacter Infections
Helicobacter pylori
Stomach
Diabetes Mellitus
Pylorus
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Prehypertension
Confidence Intervals
Digestive System Endoscopy
Biopsy
Hypertriglyceridemia
Chi-Square Distribution
Infection
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Life Style
Analysis of Variance
Multivariate Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology
  • Hepatology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Gastric Helicobacter pylori infection associated with risk of diabetes mellitus, but not prediabetes",
abstract = "Backgrounds and Aim: The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and diabetes was inconsistent in previous studies. Moreover, there are no studies on the relationship between H.pylori infection and prediabetes in the literature. The aim of this study is thus to assess the association of Helicobacter infection, diagnosed by pathology from gastric biopsy, with diabetes and prediabetes. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 1285 subjects aged 19-85 who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and gastric biopsy during health examinations at National Cheng Kung University Hospital from 2000 to 2009. Subjects were divided into three groups, including normal glucose tolerance, prediabetes, and diabetes. Diabetes and prediabetes were assessed according to the American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria. Gastric Helicobacter infection was an independent variable. Chi-square tests, analysis of variance, and multinomial logistic regression models were used to analyze the effects of Helicobacter infection on the risk of diabetes and prediabetes while controlling for age, lifestyle, pathological conditions, and laboratory variables. Results: There were significant differences in the prevalence of gastric Helicobacter infection among the three groups. The results of multivariate analysis showed that age, obesity, family history of diabetes, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia were significantly related to both prediabetes and diabetes. Helicobacter pylori infection was positively associated with diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.42, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 1.01-2.01), but not prediabetes (OR 1.02, 95{\%} CI 0.77-1.36), in addition to male gender, education level (≤9 vs >12 years), pre-hypertension, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusions: Gastric H.pylori infection is associated with diabetes, but not prediabetes.",
author = "Yang, {Gi Hua} and Jin-Shang Wu and Yi-Ching Yang and Huang, {Ying Hsiang} and Feng-Hwa Lu and Chih-Jen Chang",
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T1 - Gastric Helicobacter pylori infection associated with risk of diabetes mellitus, but not prediabetes

AU - Yang, Gi Hua

AU - Wu, Jin-Shang

AU - Yang, Yi-Ching

AU - Huang, Ying Hsiang

AU - Lu, Feng-Hwa

AU - Chang, Chih-Jen

PY - 2014/10/1

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N2 - Backgrounds and Aim: The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and diabetes was inconsistent in previous studies. Moreover, there are no studies on the relationship between H.pylori infection and prediabetes in the literature. The aim of this study is thus to assess the association of Helicobacter infection, diagnosed by pathology from gastric biopsy, with diabetes and prediabetes. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 1285 subjects aged 19-85 who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and gastric biopsy during health examinations at National Cheng Kung University Hospital from 2000 to 2009. Subjects were divided into three groups, including normal glucose tolerance, prediabetes, and diabetes. Diabetes and prediabetes were assessed according to the American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria. Gastric Helicobacter infection was an independent variable. Chi-square tests, analysis of variance, and multinomial logistic regression models were used to analyze the effects of Helicobacter infection on the risk of diabetes and prediabetes while controlling for age, lifestyle, pathological conditions, and laboratory variables. Results: There were significant differences in the prevalence of gastric Helicobacter infection among the three groups. The results of multivariate analysis showed that age, obesity, family history of diabetes, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia were significantly related to both prediabetes and diabetes. Helicobacter pylori infection was positively associated with diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-2.01), but not prediabetes (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.77-1.36), in addition to male gender, education level (≤9 vs >12 years), pre-hypertension, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusions: Gastric H.pylori infection is associated with diabetes, but not prediabetes.

AB - Backgrounds and Aim: The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and diabetes was inconsistent in previous studies. Moreover, there are no studies on the relationship between H.pylori infection and prediabetes in the literature. The aim of this study is thus to assess the association of Helicobacter infection, diagnosed by pathology from gastric biopsy, with diabetes and prediabetes. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 1285 subjects aged 19-85 who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and gastric biopsy during health examinations at National Cheng Kung University Hospital from 2000 to 2009. Subjects were divided into three groups, including normal glucose tolerance, prediabetes, and diabetes. Diabetes and prediabetes were assessed according to the American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria. Gastric Helicobacter infection was an independent variable. Chi-square tests, analysis of variance, and multinomial logistic regression models were used to analyze the effects of Helicobacter infection on the risk of diabetes and prediabetes while controlling for age, lifestyle, pathological conditions, and laboratory variables. Results: There were significant differences in the prevalence of gastric Helicobacter infection among the three groups. The results of multivariate analysis showed that age, obesity, family history of diabetes, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia were significantly related to both prediabetes and diabetes. Helicobacter pylori infection was positively associated with diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-2.01), but not prediabetes (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.77-1.36), in addition to male gender, education level (≤9 vs >12 years), pre-hypertension, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusions: Gastric H.pylori infection is associated with diabetes, but not prediabetes.

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