Gender differences in the association of smartphone use with the vitality and mental health of adolescent students

Shang Yu Yang, Chung Ying Lin, Yueh Chu Huang, Jer-Hao Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The present study examined variations in the degree of smartphone use behavior among male and female adolescents as well as the association between various degrees of smartphone use behavior and the vitality and mental health of each gender. Participants: A total of 218 adolescents were recruited from a junior college in September 2014. Methods: All the participants were asked to answer questionnaires on smartphone use. Results: The findings showed that adolescent females as compared with adolescent males exhibited significantly higher degrees of smartphone dependence and smartphone influence. Positive correlations were observed between the duration of smartphone use on weekends and the vitality/mental health of the male adolescents; negative correlations were found between smartphone dependence and the vitality/mental health of males. Conclusion: The findings demonstrate that adolescent females are deeply affected by their smartphone use. Smartphone dependence may decrease the vitality and mental health of male adolescents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)693-701
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume66
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Oct 3

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Mental Health
Students
Smartphone

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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Gender differences in the association of smartphone use with the vitality and mental health of adolescent students. / Yang, Shang Yu; Lin, Chung Ying; Huang, Yueh Chu; Chang, Jer-Hao.

In: Journal of American College Health, Vol. 66, No. 7, 03.10.2018, p. 693-701.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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