Gender Differences in the Effects of Personality Traits on Party Identification in the United States

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines whether the Big Five personality traits have different effects on male and female party identification in the United States. Research has found associations between personality traits and partisanship in the United States. However, there is solid evidence of gender differences in personality traits, and past studies have not yet considered whether personality-partisanship relationship might be gender-differentiated. This study finds that with the increase of agreeableness, women tend to be Republicans, but men tend to be Democrats. Furthermore, as openness to experience increases, women are more likely to be strong partisans, but men are more likely to be independents or leaning partisans. To sum up, this study provides evidence that the effects of the Big Five personality traits on party identification vary by gender and suggests that it is wrong to assume that the Big Five personality traits have the same impacts on male and female party identification.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-362
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Women, Politics and Policy
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jul 3

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science

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