Glutathione S-transferase M1, T1, and P1 polymorphisms as susceptibility factors for noise-induced temporary threshold shift

Cheng Yu Lin, Jiunn Liang Wu, Tung Sheng Shih, Perng Jy Tsai, Yih Min Sun, Yueliang Leon Guo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to be part of the mechanism underlying noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Glutathione is an important cellular antioxidant that limits cell damage by ROS. We aimed to determine the effect of genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase (GST) T1, GSTM1, and GSTP1, on temporary threshold shift (TTS) in 58 noise-exposed male workers from a steel factory. The pre-shift hearing impairment at high frequency (HF, average of 3, 4, and 6 kHz) was 30.7 dB HL (S.D. = 19.3). The amount of daily noise exposure was 83.0 dBA (S.D. = 5.0). Noise-induced TTS at HF by pure-tone audiometry (PTA) was related to the daily noise exposure (p < 0.05). Based on combinatory analysis, we found that individuals carrying all genotypes with GSTT1 null, GSTM1 null, and GSTP1 Ile105/Ile105 were more susceptible to NIHL. These results suggest that pre-shift hearing impairment and daily noise exposure had impacts on TTS at HF by PTA. In addition, GST genetic polymorphisms may modify the susceptibility to noise-induced TTS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8-15
Number of pages8
JournalHearing Research
Volume257
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Nov 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sensory Systems

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