Habitual or reasoned? Using the theory of planned behavior, technology acceptance model, and habit to examine switching intentions toward public transit

Ching-Fu Chen, Wei Hsiang Chao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How to reduce private vehicle use and to encourage public transit have always been the fundamental policy goals of transportation authorities. Whether mode choice behaviors are reasoned action or habit has also been debated, resulting in mixed arguments. This study proposes an integrated model combining the theory of planned behavior (TPB), the technology acceptance model (TAM), and habit to examine the switching intentions toward public transit by private vehicle users (both car and motorcycle users). The results reveal that through a comparison with the TPB variables, the habitual behavior of private vehicle use hinders an individual's intention to switch from a car or motorcycle to public transit. Furthermore, motorcycle commuters are more likely than car commuters to resist their habitual mode use behavior in switching to public transit through their reasoned evaluation process. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-137
Number of pages10
JournalTransportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Motorcycles
Habits
habits
Railroad cars
acceptance
motorcycle
Technology
commuter
Choice Behavior
Switches
evaluation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Automotive Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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