High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Attenuates Neural Responses of Sciatic Nerves Isolated from Normal or Neuropathic Rats

Yee Fun Lee, Chou-Ching Lin, Jung Sung Cheng, Gin Shin Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients with diabetic neuropathy often have neuropathic pain. The purpose of our work was to investigate the effects of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on the conduction block of normal and neuropathic nerves for soothing pain. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used, and diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection. Diabetic neuropathy was evaluated with animal behavior tests. Sciatic nerves of both control and neuropathic rats were dissected from the starting point of the sciatic nerve to the point where the sural nerve ends near the ankle. The nerves were stored in Ringer's solution. The invitro nerve was placed on a self-developed experimental platform for HIFU exposure. Stimulation and recording of the compound action potentials (CAPs) and sensory action potentials (SAPs) were performed. Control and neuropathic nerves exposed or not exposed to HIFU were submitted to histologic analysis. For the control and neuropathic nerves, suppression of CAPs and SAPs started 2min post-HIFU treatment. Maximum suppression of SAPs was 34.4±3.2% for the control rats and 11.6±2.0% and 9.8±3.0% for rats 4wk post-injection and 8wk post-injection, respectively. Time to full recovery was 25, 70 and 80min, respectively. Histologic analysis revealed that the nerves in which CAPs and SAPs did not fully recover were damaged thermally or mechanically by HIFU. It is feasible to reversibly block nerves with appropriate HIFU treatment. Diabetic nerves were less suppressed by HIFU and were more vulnerable to permanent damage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)132-142
Number of pages11
JournalUltrasound in Medicine and Biology
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

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nerves
Sciatic Nerve
Action Potentials
rats
Neuralgia
Diabetic Neuropathies
Injections
pain
injection
Sural Nerve
Animal Behavior
Nerve Block
Streptozocin
Ankle
retarding
Sprague Dawley Rats
stimulation
animals
Therapeutics
platforms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

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title = "High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Attenuates Neural Responses of Sciatic Nerves Isolated from Normal or Neuropathic Rats",
abstract = "Patients with diabetic neuropathy often have neuropathic pain. The purpose of our work was to investigate the effects of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on the conduction block of normal and neuropathic nerves for soothing pain. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used, and diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection. Diabetic neuropathy was evaluated with animal behavior tests. Sciatic nerves of both control and neuropathic rats were dissected from the starting point of the sciatic nerve to the point where the sural nerve ends near the ankle. The nerves were stored in Ringer's solution. The invitro nerve was placed on a self-developed experimental platform for HIFU exposure. Stimulation and recording of the compound action potentials (CAPs) and sensory action potentials (SAPs) were performed. Control and neuropathic nerves exposed or not exposed to HIFU were submitted to histologic analysis. For the control and neuropathic nerves, suppression of CAPs and SAPs started 2min post-HIFU treatment. Maximum suppression of SAPs was 34.4±3.2{\%} for the control rats and 11.6±2.0{\%} and 9.8±3.0{\%} for rats 4wk post-injection and 8wk post-injection, respectively. Time to full recovery was 25, 70 and 80min, respectively. Histologic analysis revealed that the nerves in which CAPs and SAPs did not fully recover were damaged thermally or mechanically by HIFU. It is feasible to reversibly block nerves with appropriate HIFU treatment. Diabetic nerves were less suppressed by HIFU and were more vulnerable to permanent damage.",
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High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Attenuates Neural Responses of Sciatic Nerves Isolated from Normal or Neuropathic Rats. / Lee, Yee Fun; Lin, Chou-Ching; Cheng, Jung Sung; Chen, Gin Shin.

In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, Vol. 41, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 132-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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