High temperature impact properties and dislocation substructure of Ti–6Al–7Nb biomedical alloy

Woei-Shyan Lee, Chia Wei Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The high temperature deformation and dislocation substructure of Ti–6Al–7Nb biomedical alloy are investigated under high strain rate loading conditions using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar. Impact tests are performed at strain rates ranging from 1×103 s−1 to 3×103 s−1 and temperatures of 300 °C and 700 °C, respectively. The experimental results show that the flow stress, work hardening coefficient and strain rate sensitivity all increase with increasing strain rate, but decrease with increasing temperature. Moreover, the fracture observations reveal that the Ti–6Al–7Nb specimens fail predominantly as the result of intensive localised shearing. The fracture surfaces of the deformed specimens contain both cleavage structures and dimple-like structures. Transmission electron microscopy observations reveal that the dislocation density increases with increasing strain rate, but decreases with increasing temperature. A pronounced thermal softening effect is observed in the specimens deformed at 700 °C due to a rapid annihilation of the dislocations. However, a work hardening effect occurs at higher strain rates and lower temperatures due to an enhanced degree of dislocation multiplication and tangling. Finally, a linear relationship is observed between the square root of the dislocation density and the flow stress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-100
Number of pages10
JournalMaterials Science and Engineering A
Volume576
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Aug 1

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substructures
strain rate
Strain rate
work hardening
Plastic flow
Strain hardening
Temperature
tangling
impact tests
temperature
shearing
Shearing
multiplication
softening
Thermal effects
Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy
cleavage
Transmission electron microscopy
transmission electron microscopy
coefficients

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "The high temperature deformation and dislocation substructure of Ti–6Al–7Nb biomedical alloy are investigated under high strain rate loading conditions using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar. Impact tests are performed at strain rates ranging from 1×103 s−1 to 3×103 s−1 and temperatures of 300 °C and 700 °C, respectively. The experimental results show that the flow stress, work hardening coefficient and strain rate sensitivity all increase with increasing strain rate, but decrease with increasing temperature. Moreover, the fracture observations reveal that the Ti–6Al–7Nb specimens fail predominantly as the result of intensive localised shearing. The fracture surfaces of the deformed specimens contain both cleavage structures and dimple-like structures. Transmission electron microscopy observations reveal that the dislocation density increases with increasing strain rate, but decreases with increasing temperature. A pronounced thermal softening effect is observed in the specimens deformed at 700 °C due to a rapid annihilation of the dislocations. However, a work hardening effect occurs at higher strain rates and lower temperatures due to an enhanced degree of dislocation multiplication and tangling. Finally, a linear relationship is observed between the square root of the dislocation density and the flow stress.",
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High temperature impact properties and dislocation substructure of Ti–6Al–7Nb biomedical alloy. / Lee, Woei-Shyan; Chen, Chia Wei.

In: Materials Science and Engineering A, Vol. 576, 01.08.2013, p. 91-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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