Identification of inventory-based susceptibility models for assessing landslide probability: a case study of the Gaoping River Basin, Taiwan

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study describes the use of inventory-based landslide susceptibility index (LSI) models based on the selection of causative factors, functional relationships between factors and integration to a hazard-warning model. We first merged landslide inventory data of five typhoon-training events and obtained sets of data representing environmental conditions where landslides are likely to occur. These well-defined data sets are used to select five representative causative factors, i.e. the slope angle, rock strength, drainage, curvature and soil type. Four bivariate statistical model combinations were tested: the linear combination, geometric mean, and two other mixed combinations. As a result, the modulation effects between (i) rock strength and slope and (ii) drainage and curvature were intensified in mixed model 2 (MX2) through factor multiplication. The MX2 LSI was integrated with three multivariate landslide hazard-warning models and tested with four triggering factor rainfall parameter sets. Results lead to the conclusion that threshold models with terrain-influenced rainfall can better identify hazard-warning locations. Modulating factor combinations for the hazard warning can also mirror true environmental conditions, yielding more representative model results. This study improves the method for identifying LSI models for the application to rainfall-triggered landslide hazard models.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1730-1751
Number of pages22
JournalGeomatics, Natural Hazards and Risk
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Dec 15

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Environmental Science
  • General Earth and Planetary Sciences

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