Identifying Multiple Abdominal Organs from CT Image Series Using a Multimodule Contextual Neural Network and Spatial Fuzzy Rules

Chien Cheng Lee, Pau Choo Chung, Hong Ming Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Identifying abdominal organs is one of the essential steps in visualizing organ structure to assist in teaching, clinical training, diagnosis, and medical image retrieval. However, due to partial volume effects, gray-level similarities of adjacent organs, contrast media affect, and the relatively high variations of organ position and shape, automatically identifying abdominal organs has always been a high challenging task. To conquer these difficulties, this paper proposes combining a multimodule contextual neural network and spatial fuzzy rules and fuzzy descriptors for automatically identifying abdominal organs from a series of CT image slices. The multimodule contextual neural network segments each image slice through a divide-and-conquer concept, embedded within multiple neural network modules, where the results obtained from each module are forwarded to other modules for integration, in which contextual constraints are enforced. With this approach, the difficulties arising from partial volume effects, gray-level similarities of adjacent organs, and contrast media affect can be reduced to the extreme. To address the issue of high variations in organ position and shape, spatial fuzzy rules and fuzzy descriptors are adopted, along with a contour modification scheme implementing consecutive organ region overlap constraints. This approach has been tested on 40 sets of abdominal CT images, where each set consists of about 40 image slices. We have found that 99% of the organ regions in the test images are correctly identified as its belonging organs, implying the high promise of the proposed method.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)208-217
Number of pages10
JournalIEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Sep 1

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Fuzzy rules
Contrast Media
Contrast media
Neural networks
Teaching
Image retrieval

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "Identifying abdominal organs is one of the essential steps in visualizing organ structure to assist in teaching, clinical training, diagnosis, and medical image retrieval. However, due to partial volume effects, gray-level similarities of adjacent organs, contrast media affect, and the relatively high variations of organ position and shape, automatically identifying abdominal organs has always been a high challenging task. To conquer these difficulties, this paper proposes combining a multimodule contextual neural network and spatial fuzzy rules and fuzzy descriptors for automatically identifying abdominal organs from a series of CT image slices. The multimodule contextual neural network segments each image slice through a divide-and-conquer concept, embedded within multiple neural network modules, where the results obtained from each module are forwarded to other modules for integration, in which contextual constraints are enforced. With this approach, the difficulties arising from partial volume effects, gray-level similarities of adjacent organs, and contrast media affect can be reduced to the extreme. To address the issue of high variations in organ position and shape, spatial fuzzy rules and fuzzy descriptors are adopted, along with a contour modification scheme implementing consecutive organ region overlap constraints. This approach has been tested on 40 sets of abdominal CT images, where each set consists of about 40 image slices. We have found that 99{\%} of the organ regions in the test images are correctly identified as its belonging organs, implying the high promise of the proposed method.",
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