Illness uncertainty and related factors in patients with sudden hearing loss

Lee Ya-Hui, Wang Huey-Ling, Chung-Yi Li, Shiao An-Suey, Tu Tzong-Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss occurs mainly in individuals between 40 and 60 years of age. Most sudden hearing loss cases of nonspecific cause lack well-defined treatments and have no predictable progress. Sudden hearing loss symptoms, diagnoses and illness patterns resemble factors that Mishel's Theory of Uncertainty in Illness identify as potential causes of uncertainty. Uncertainty may block communication and affect a patient's ability to adapt to his or her condition and accept treatment. Purpose: This study describes level of uncertainty in illness and explores related factors among patients with sudden hearing loss. Methods: The authors employed a cross-sectional study design and recruited 60 patients with an initial diagnosis of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Data collected using a structured questionnaire included participant demographics and the Chinese version of the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale (MUIS). Results: Results showed: (1) Illness uncertainty in participants was high (M = 71.75, SD = 12.93); (2) Perceived understanding of illness was the only variable significantly related to illness uncertainty (p <.01); and (3) Education, gender, type of occupation, religious belief, perceived illness severity, perceived illness understanding and perceived self-control over symptoms explained 25% of illness uncertainty variance. "Perceived understanding of illness" was identified as a significant predictor of illness uncertainty (p <.01). Conclusions / Implications for practice: Increasing illness understanding should be a focus of nursing care for sudden hearing loss patients in order to decrease patient illness uncertainty.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-157
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nursing and Healthcare Research
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan 1

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Sudden Hearing Loss
Uncertainty
Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Aptitude
Religion
Nursing Care
Occupations
Cross-Sectional Studies
Communication
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Ya-Hui, Lee ; Huey-Ling, Wang ; Li, Chung-Yi ; An-Suey, Shiao ; Tzong-Yang, Tu. / Illness uncertainty and related factors in patients with sudden hearing loss. In: Journal of Nursing and Healthcare Research. 2012 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 149-157.
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Illness uncertainty and related factors in patients with sudden hearing loss. / Ya-Hui, Lee; Huey-Ling, Wang; Li, Chung-Yi; An-Suey, Shiao; Tzong-Yang, Tu.

In: Journal of Nursing and Healthcare Research, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.01.2012, p. 149-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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