Immigrant-native differences in caries-related knowledge, attitude, and oral health behaviors: A cross-sectional study in Taiwan

Chih Chang Chen, Shang Jyh Chiou, Chun Chan Ting, Ying Chun Lin, Chih Cheng Hsu, Fu Li Chen, Chien Hung Lee, Ted Chen, Chin Shun Chang, Ya Ying Lin, Hsiao Ling Huang

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: With the growing number of transnational marriages in Taiwan, oral health disparities have become a public health issue. This study assessed immigrant-native differences in oral health behaviors of urban mothers and their children.Methods: We used the baseline data of an oral health promotion program to examine the immigrant-native differences in caries-related knowledge, attitude, and oral health behaviors. A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect data from mothers in urban area, Taiwan. A total of 150 immigrant and 440 native mothers completed the self-report questionnaires. Logistic regression models analyzed the racial differences in oral health behaviors.Results: Approximately 37% of immigrant mothers used dental floss, 25% used fluoride toothpaste, and only 13.5% of them regularly visited a dentist. Less that 40% of immigrant mothers brush their children's teeth before aged one year, 45% replaced child's toothbrush within 3 months, and only half of the mothers regularly took their child to the dentist. Immigrant mothers had lower level of caries-related knowledge and attitudes than native mothers (p < .001). Compared to native group, the immigrant mothers were less likely to use of dental floss ([Adjusted odds ratio (aOR) =0.35], fluoride toothpaste (aOR = 0.29), visit a dentist in the past 2 years (aOR = 0.26), and take their children to regular dental check-up (aOR = 0.38); whereas, they were more likely to not consume sweeten beverages (aOR = 3.13).Conclusions: The level of caries-related knowledge, attitudes and oral health behaviors were found lower in immigrant mothers than native ones. The findings suggested cross-cultural caries prevention programs aimed at reducing immigrant-native disparities in child oral health care must be developed for these immigrant minorities.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3
JournalBMC Oral Health
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 14

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

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