Impact mechanical response and microstructural evolution of Ti alloy under various temperatures

Su Tang Chiou, Hsien Lung Tsai, Woei-Shyan Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A compressive split-Hopkinson pressure bar and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are used to investigate the mechanical behaviour and microstructural evolution of a Ti alloy (Ti-1.1Mo-5.2Zr-2.9Al-0.35Fe-0.05N-0.20 O-0.02H in wt.%) deformed at strain rates ranging from 8 × 102 s-1 to 8 × 103 s-1 and temperatures between 25 °C and 900 °C. In general, the results indicate that the mechanical behaviour and microstructural evolution of the alloy are highly sensitive to both the strain rate and the temperature conditions. The flow stress curves are found to include both a work-hardening region and a work-softening region. The strain rate sensitivity parameter, β, increases with increasing strain and strain rate, but decreases with increasing temperature. The activation energy varies inversely with the flow stress, and has a low value at high deformation strain rates or low temperatures. The microstructural observations reveal that the strengthening effect evident in the deformed alloy is a result primarily of dislocations and the formation of α phase. The dislocation density increases with increasing strain rate, but decreases with increasing temperature. Additionally, the square root of the dislocation density varies linearly with the flow stress. Correlating the mechanical properties of the current Ti alloy with the TEM observations, it is concluded that the precipitation of α phase dominates the fracture strain. TEM observations reveal that the amount of α phase increases with increasing temperature below the β transus temperature. The maximum amount of α phase is formed at a temperature of 700 °C and results in the minimum fracture strain under the current loading conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2282-2294
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Materials Processing Technology
Volume209
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Mar 1

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Microstructural evolution
Strain rate
Plastic flow
Temperature
Electron microscopes
Strengthening (metal)
Strain hardening
Activation energy
Mechanical properties

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Metals and Alloys
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "A compressive split-Hopkinson pressure bar and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are used to investigate the mechanical behaviour and microstructural evolution of a Ti alloy (Ti-1.1Mo-5.2Zr-2.9Al-0.35Fe-0.05N-0.20 O-0.02H in wt.{\%}) deformed at strain rates ranging from 8 × 102 s-1 to 8 × 103 s-1 and temperatures between 25 °C and 900 °C. In general, the results indicate that the mechanical behaviour and microstructural evolution of the alloy are highly sensitive to both the strain rate and the temperature conditions. The flow stress curves are found to include both a work-hardening region and a work-softening region. The strain rate sensitivity parameter, β, increases with increasing strain and strain rate, but decreases with increasing temperature. The activation energy varies inversely with the flow stress, and has a low value at high deformation strain rates or low temperatures. The microstructural observations reveal that the strengthening effect evident in the deformed alloy is a result primarily of dislocations and the formation of α phase. The dislocation density increases with increasing strain rate, but decreases with increasing temperature. Additionally, the square root of the dislocation density varies linearly with the flow stress. Correlating the mechanical properties of the current Ti alloy with the TEM observations, it is concluded that the precipitation of α phase dominates the fracture strain. TEM observations reveal that the amount of α phase increases with increasing temperature below the β transus temperature. The maximum amount of α phase is formed at a temperature of 700 °C and results in the minimum fracture strain under the current loading conditions.",
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Impact mechanical response and microstructural evolution of Ti alloy under various temperatures. / Chiou, Su Tang; Tsai, Hsien Lung; Lee, Woei-Shyan.

In: Journal of Materials Processing Technology, Vol. 209, No. 5, 01.03.2009, p. 2282-2294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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