Impact of etiologic factors and APACHE II and POSSUM scores in management and clinical outcome of acute intestinal ischemic disorders after surgical treatment

Hui-Ping Hsu, Yan-Shen Shan, Yu Hsiang Hsieh, Chun Wei Shih, Pin Wen Lin

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15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Acute intestinal ischemic disorder (AIID) is an uncommon vascular disease with high mortality. According to etiology, it can be categorized into three groups: arterial occlusive mesenteric ischemia (AOMI), mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT), and nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI). This study analyzes the effect of classification on surgical outcome. Patients and Methods: All AIID patients who underwent operative treatment at National Cheng Kung University Hospital between January 1989 and August 2003 were enrolled in this study. Preoperative information on these patients was compared to find predictors of outcome. Results: Data from 77 patients (49 men and 28 women, median age 70 years) were analyzed. The etiology was AOMI in 30 patients, MVT in 19 patients, and NOMI in 28 patients. Median age was younger in MVT (54 years) than in AOMI (70 years) or NOMI (72 years). In addition, MVT usually involved the jejunum (74%, versus 31% in AOMI and 46% in NOMI), whereas both AOMI and NOMI involved ileum and colon. The patients with AOMI had shorter duration of symptoms and higher ratio of underlying hypertension than those with MVT. The overall mortality rate was 53.2% (41/77). The day 1 and day 30 mortality were 0% and 10.5% in MVT, 16.7% and 30% in AOMI, and 42.9% and 67.9% in NOMI, respectively (P < 0.05). Both the etiology and the APACHE II scores were significant risk factors for day 30 and long-term mortality. The patients with NOMI had higher POSSUM physiologic scores than patients with MVT. The P-POSSUM regression equation can accurately predict mortality. Conclusions: Patients with MVT had a more favorable prognosis, whereas those with NOMI had the worst outlook. The APACHE II and POSSUM scoring systems are useful in predicting the clinical outcome. Early diagnosis and classification of AIID patients are useful for aggressive treatment to improve the clinical outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2152-2162
Number of pages11
JournalWorld journal of surgery
Volume30
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Dec 1

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APACHE
Therapeutics
Mesenteric Ischemia
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

@article{4b66519fb4ad4260830c27ab247aa98c,
title = "Impact of etiologic factors and APACHE II and POSSUM scores in management and clinical outcome of acute intestinal ischemic disorders after surgical treatment",
abstract = "Background: Acute intestinal ischemic disorder (AIID) is an uncommon vascular disease with high mortality. According to etiology, it can be categorized into three groups: arterial occlusive mesenteric ischemia (AOMI), mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT), and nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI). This study analyzes the effect of classification on surgical outcome. Patients and Methods: All AIID patients who underwent operative treatment at National Cheng Kung University Hospital between January 1989 and August 2003 were enrolled in this study. Preoperative information on these patients was compared to find predictors of outcome. Results: Data from 77 patients (49 men and 28 women, median age 70 years) were analyzed. The etiology was AOMI in 30 patients, MVT in 19 patients, and NOMI in 28 patients. Median age was younger in MVT (54 years) than in AOMI (70 years) or NOMI (72 years). In addition, MVT usually involved the jejunum (74{\%}, versus 31{\%} in AOMI and 46{\%} in NOMI), whereas both AOMI and NOMI involved ileum and colon. The patients with AOMI had shorter duration of symptoms and higher ratio of underlying hypertension than those with MVT. The overall mortality rate was 53.2{\%} (41/77). The day 1 and day 30 mortality were 0{\%} and 10.5{\%} in MVT, 16.7{\%} and 30{\%} in AOMI, and 42.9{\%} and 67.9{\%} in NOMI, respectively (P < 0.05). Both the etiology and the APACHE II scores were significant risk factors for day 30 and long-term mortality. The patients with NOMI had higher POSSUM physiologic scores than patients with MVT. The P-POSSUM regression equation can accurately predict mortality. Conclusions: Patients with MVT had a more favorable prognosis, whereas those with NOMI had the worst outlook. The APACHE II and POSSUM scoring systems are useful in predicting the clinical outcome. Early diagnosis and classification of AIID patients are useful for aggressive treatment to improve the clinical outcome.",
author = "Hui-Ping Hsu and Yan-Shen Shan and Hsieh, {Yu Hsiang} and Shih, {Chun Wei} and Lin, {Pin Wen}",
year = "2006",
month = "12",
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doi = "10.1007/s00268-005-0716-3",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "2152--2162",
journal = "World Journal of Surgery",
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publisher = "Springer New York",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of etiologic factors and APACHE II and POSSUM scores in management and clinical outcome of acute intestinal ischemic disorders after surgical treatment

AU - Hsu, Hui-Ping

AU - Shan, Yan-Shen

AU - Hsieh, Yu Hsiang

AU - Shih, Chun Wei

AU - Lin, Pin Wen

PY - 2006/12/1

Y1 - 2006/12/1

N2 - Background: Acute intestinal ischemic disorder (AIID) is an uncommon vascular disease with high mortality. According to etiology, it can be categorized into three groups: arterial occlusive mesenteric ischemia (AOMI), mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT), and nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI). This study analyzes the effect of classification on surgical outcome. Patients and Methods: All AIID patients who underwent operative treatment at National Cheng Kung University Hospital between January 1989 and August 2003 were enrolled in this study. Preoperative information on these patients was compared to find predictors of outcome. Results: Data from 77 patients (49 men and 28 women, median age 70 years) were analyzed. The etiology was AOMI in 30 patients, MVT in 19 patients, and NOMI in 28 patients. Median age was younger in MVT (54 years) than in AOMI (70 years) or NOMI (72 years). In addition, MVT usually involved the jejunum (74%, versus 31% in AOMI and 46% in NOMI), whereas both AOMI and NOMI involved ileum and colon. The patients with AOMI had shorter duration of symptoms and higher ratio of underlying hypertension than those with MVT. The overall mortality rate was 53.2% (41/77). The day 1 and day 30 mortality were 0% and 10.5% in MVT, 16.7% and 30% in AOMI, and 42.9% and 67.9% in NOMI, respectively (P < 0.05). Both the etiology and the APACHE II scores were significant risk factors for day 30 and long-term mortality. The patients with NOMI had higher POSSUM physiologic scores than patients with MVT. The P-POSSUM regression equation can accurately predict mortality. Conclusions: Patients with MVT had a more favorable prognosis, whereas those with NOMI had the worst outlook. The APACHE II and POSSUM scoring systems are useful in predicting the clinical outcome. Early diagnosis and classification of AIID patients are useful for aggressive treatment to improve the clinical outcome.

AB - Background: Acute intestinal ischemic disorder (AIID) is an uncommon vascular disease with high mortality. According to etiology, it can be categorized into three groups: arterial occlusive mesenteric ischemia (AOMI), mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT), and nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI). This study analyzes the effect of classification on surgical outcome. Patients and Methods: All AIID patients who underwent operative treatment at National Cheng Kung University Hospital between January 1989 and August 2003 were enrolled in this study. Preoperative information on these patients was compared to find predictors of outcome. Results: Data from 77 patients (49 men and 28 women, median age 70 years) were analyzed. The etiology was AOMI in 30 patients, MVT in 19 patients, and NOMI in 28 patients. Median age was younger in MVT (54 years) than in AOMI (70 years) or NOMI (72 years). In addition, MVT usually involved the jejunum (74%, versus 31% in AOMI and 46% in NOMI), whereas both AOMI and NOMI involved ileum and colon. The patients with AOMI had shorter duration of symptoms and higher ratio of underlying hypertension than those with MVT. The overall mortality rate was 53.2% (41/77). The day 1 and day 30 mortality were 0% and 10.5% in MVT, 16.7% and 30% in AOMI, and 42.9% and 67.9% in NOMI, respectively (P < 0.05). Both the etiology and the APACHE II scores were significant risk factors for day 30 and long-term mortality. The patients with NOMI had higher POSSUM physiologic scores than patients with MVT. The P-POSSUM regression equation can accurately predict mortality. Conclusions: Patients with MVT had a more favorable prognosis, whereas those with NOMI had the worst outlook. The APACHE II and POSSUM scoring systems are useful in predicting the clinical outcome. Early diagnosis and classification of AIID patients are useful for aggressive treatment to improve the clinical outcome.

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