Implicit biases in blame allocation of accidents across organizational components (worker, supervisor and organization)

Elizabet Haro, Yu-Hsiu Hung, Hyun Seung Yoo, Robin Littlejohn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between implicit biases and blame allocation of accidents across organizational components (workers, supervisors, and organization). The 'European American-African American' and created 'Latino-African American' Implicit Association Tests (IAT) were used to measure the participants' implicit biases. The Accident Blame Allocation instrument was used to measure the participants' blame allocations, which included accident scenarios with pictures of male and female faces of European Americans, African Americans and Latinos. A total of 102 students, aged from 18 to 23, participated in the study. Results of the two IATs showed that the participants did not have obvious preference tendencies toward any ethnicity, and the 'European American-African American' and 'Latino-African American' IATs have a positive correlation with score of 0.48 (p < 0.0001). Results of this study showed that implicit bias did not significantly correlate with accident blame allocation but that the participants' attitudes toward different ethnic groups affected their accident blame allocation patterns.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009
Pages998-1002
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Dec 1
Event53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009 - San Antonio, TX, United States
Duration: 2009 Oct 192009 Oct 23

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySan Antonio, TX
Period09-10-1909-10-23

Fingerprint

Supervisory personnel
Accidents
accident
worker
organization
trend
ethnic group
ethnicity
American
Students
scenario
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Haro, E., Hung, Y-H., Yoo, H. S., & Littlejohn, R. (2009). Implicit biases in blame allocation of accidents across organizational components (worker, supervisor and organization). In 53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009 (pp. 998-1002). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 2).
Haro, Elizabet ; Hung, Yu-Hsiu ; Yoo, Hyun Seung ; Littlejohn, Robin. / Implicit biases in blame allocation of accidents across organizational components (worker, supervisor and organization). 53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009. 2009. pp. 998-1002 (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society).
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Haro, E, Hung, Y-H, Yoo, HS & Littlejohn, R 2009, Implicit biases in blame allocation of accidents across organizational components (worker, supervisor and organization). in 53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, vol. 2, pp. 998-1002, 53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009, San Antonio, TX, United States, 09-10-19.

Implicit biases in blame allocation of accidents across organizational components (worker, supervisor and organization). / Haro, Elizabet; Hung, Yu-Hsiu; Yoo, Hyun Seung; Littlejohn, Robin.

53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009. 2009. p. 998-1002 (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 2).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Haro E, Hung Y-H, Yoo HS, Littlejohn R. Implicit biases in blame allocation of accidents across organizational components (worker, supervisor and organization). In 53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009. 2009. p. 998-1002. (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society).