Improved emotional stability in experienced meditators with concentrative meditation based on electroencephalography and heart rate variability

Yu Hao Lee, Yung Jong Shiah, Sharon Chia Ju Chen, Shih Feng Wang, Ming Shing Young, Chih Lung Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether emotional stability distinguishes how experienced and novice meditators react to visual stimuli. Design: Participants practiced concentrative meditation and then responded to visual stimuli while continuing to meditate. Participants: Ten experienced and 10 novice meditators responded to sequences of visual stimuli after concentrative meditation. Results: As predicted, both groups had increased parasympathetic activities during concentrative meditation. Experienced meditators had increased low-frequency electroencephalography (EEG) rhythms in response to visual stimulation, whereas novices had increased high-frequency EEG rhythms. Correlational analyses revealed that novice meditators changed from a meditative state to a nonrelaxed state when the visual stimuli were presented, whereas experienced meditators maintained the meditative state. Conclusion: The study provides evidence that regular concentrative meditation can improve emotional stability and that recording physiologic responses to visual stimuli can be a good method for identifying the effects of long-term concentrative meditation practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-39
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

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