In vitro study of ultrasound based real-time tracking for renal stones in shock wave lithotripsy: Part II - A simulated animal experiment

C. C. Chang, I. Manousakas, Y. R. Pu, S. M. Liang, C. H. Chen, T. S. Chen, F. M. Yu, W. H. Yang, Y. C. Tong, C. L. Kuo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We have previously developed and reported an ultrasound based real-time tracking system for renal stones. In the current study we continued to verify the reliability of this tracking system by a simulated animal test. Materials and Methods: We used 13 prerecorded ultrasound stone trajectories to test the system. The real-time tracking system was implemented on the Litemed 9200 electrohydraulic lithotriptor (LiteMed Co., Taipei, Taiwan). An artificial stone and tap water were sealed in a balloon. The balloon was inserted into the pelvis of a pig kidney. While the kidney was affixed to and moved by a simulator, it was immersed in a specifically designed simulated animal model tank containing tap water. The stone was localized by ultrasound. The kidney was moved by the simulator according to a prerecorded stone trajectory. A total of 3,000 shock waves were delivered to the stone. For each recorded stone trajectory experiments were done under nontracking and tracking conditions. We performed tests of the fragment-to-weight ratio, which denotes the performance of a shock wave lithotriptor when fragmenting a stone. Results: The mean fragment-to-weight ratio was 55.3% ± 25.9% in the nontracking and 100% ± 0% in the tracking group. The difference in these 2 groups was statistically significant (paired t test p < 0.01). Conclusions: The ultrasound based real-time tracking system proved to improve the performance of a shock wave lithotriptor significantly when fragmenting stones in a simulated animal test. We believe that the tracking system would greatly reduce the number of shocks and time needed for treating renal stones.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2594-2597
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume167
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

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