Incident reporting culture: Scale development with validation and reliability and assessment of hospital nurses in Taiwan

Hui Ying Chiang, Ya Chu Hsiao, Shu Yuan Lin, Huan Fang Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the psychometric validity and reliability of the incident reporting culture questionnaire (IRCQ; in Chinese) following an exploration of the reporting culture perceived by hospital nurses in Taiwan. Design: Scale development with psychometric examination and a cross-sectional study. Setting: Ten teaching hospitals. Participants: A total of 1064 nurses participated with an average response rate of 83% between November 2008 and June 2009. Main Outcome Measures: The factorial construct, criterion-related validity, homogeneity and stability of the IRCQ were evaluated. The nurses' perceptions of the IRCQ were also explored. Results: The four-factor structure of the 20-item IRCQ had satisfactory construct validity (explained variance: 49.37%), criterion-related validity (r = 0.42; P = 0.001), reliability (Cronbach's alpha: 0.83) and stability (3-week-interval correlation: r = 0.80; P = 0.001). These factors included 'application of learning from errors', 'readiness to provide feedback on incident reports', 'collegial atmospheres of unpleasantness and punishment' (CA) and 'incident management: confidential and system driven'. The nurses perceived a moderate overall reporting culture (mean positive response = 49.25%; range: 67.2-24.94%). They weakly agreed on the CA factor of five items (mean positive response = 24.94%; range: 33.0-17.2%). Conclusions: This study provides empirical evidence for the psychometric properties of the IRCQ and the reporting culture which nurses perceive in Taiwan. To Taiwanese nurses, the reporting culture within their work environments especially as it relates to coworker relations, inter-professional collaboration and non-punitive atmosphere is their major concern. Healthcare administrators should consider nurses' perceptions related to incident reporting when managing underreporting issues.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbermzr031
Pages (from-to)429-436
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal for Quality in Health Care
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Aug 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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