Increased tea consumption is associated with decreased arterial stiffness in a Chinese population

Chung-Hao Li, Yi-Ching Yang, Jin-Shang Wu, Ying Hsiang Huang, Chih Ting Lee, Feng-Hwa Lu, Chih-Jen Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Tea has attracted considerable attention for its potential cardioprotective effects. The primary chemical components of tea are thought to have a beneficial effect by reducing arterial stiffness. The objective of this study was to assess the association between tea consumption and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in a relatively healthy Chinese population. Methods: We enrolled 3,135 apparently healthy subjects from October 2006 to August 2009. Subjects taking medication for diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia, or with a history of cardiovascular disease, were excluded from the study. The subjects were categorized into three groups according to their tea-drinking habits: (1) none to low (n = 1615), defined as non-habitual tea drinkers, or drinking for <1 year, or drinking ≤150 mL per day for ≥1 year ; (2) moderate tea consumption, defined as drinking for ≥1 year and consumption between 151 and 450 mL per day; and (3) heavy tea consumption, defined as a drinking for ≥1 year and consumption >450 mL per day. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine whether different levels of consumption were independently associated with the highest quartile of baPWV values, defined as ≥1428.5 cm/s. Results: Of the 3,135 subjects, 48.5% had drunk >150 mL of tea per day for at least 1 year. In multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for co-variables, including, age, sex, current smoking, alcohol use, habitual exercise, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TC/HDL-C) ratio >5, obesity, newly diagnosed hypertension and diabetes, subjects with high tea consumption had a decreased risk of highest quartile of baPWV by 22% (odds ratio = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.98, p = 0.032), while subjects with moderate tea consumption did not (p = 0.742), as compared subjects with none to low tea consumption. Conclusions: High, but not moderate, habitual tea consumption may decrease arterial stiffness.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere86022
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 22

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Vascular Stiffness
Tea
tea
Stiffness
Population
Pulse Wave Analysis
Ankle
Arm
legumes
Medical problems
drinking
hypertension
Drinking
diabetes
Hypertension
cardioprotective effect
risk reduction
Cholesterol
hyperlipidemia
Hyperlipidemias

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

@article{38d87eb327b14d71814138bd3b0791b7,
title = "Increased tea consumption is associated with decreased arterial stiffness in a Chinese population",
abstract = "Background: Tea has attracted considerable attention for its potential cardioprotective effects. The primary chemical components of tea are thought to have a beneficial effect by reducing arterial stiffness. The objective of this study was to assess the association between tea consumption and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in a relatively healthy Chinese population. Methods: We enrolled 3,135 apparently healthy subjects from October 2006 to August 2009. Subjects taking medication for diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia, or with a history of cardiovascular disease, were excluded from the study. The subjects were categorized into three groups according to their tea-drinking habits: (1) none to low (n = 1615), defined as non-habitual tea drinkers, or drinking for <1 year, or drinking ≤150 mL per day for ≥1 year ; (2) moderate tea consumption, defined as drinking for ≥1 year and consumption between 151 and 450 mL per day; and (3) heavy tea consumption, defined as a drinking for ≥1 year and consumption >450 mL per day. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine whether different levels of consumption were independently associated with the highest quartile of baPWV values, defined as ≥1428.5 cm/s. Results: Of the 3,135 subjects, 48.5{\%} had drunk >150 mL of tea per day for at least 1 year. In multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for co-variables, including, age, sex, current smoking, alcohol use, habitual exercise, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TC/HDL-C) ratio >5, obesity, newly diagnosed hypertension and diabetes, subjects with high tea consumption had a decreased risk of highest quartile of baPWV by 22{\%} (odds ratio = 0.78, 95{\%} confidence interval = 0.62-0.98, p = 0.032), while subjects with moderate tea consumption did not (p = 0.742), as compared subjects with none to low tea consumption. Conclusions: High, but not moderate, habitual tea consumption may decrease arterial stiffness.",
author = "Chung-Hao Li and Yi-Ching Yang and Jin-Shang Wu and Huang, {Ying Hsiang} and Lee, {Chih Ting} and Feng-Hwa Lu and Chih-Jen Chang",
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Increased tea consumption is associated with decreased arterial stiffness in a Chinese population. / Li, Chung-Hao; Yang, Yi-Ching; Wu, Jin-Shang; Huang, Ying Hsiang; Lee, Chih Ting; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Chang, Chih-Jen.

In: PloS one, Vol. 9, No. 1, e86022, 22.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increased tea consumption is associated with decreased arterial stiffness in a Chinese population

AU - Li, Chung-Hao

AU - Yang, Yi-Ching

AU - Wu, Jin-Shang

AU - Huang, Ying Hsiang

AU - Lee, Chih Ting

AU - Lu, Feng-Hwa

AU - Chang, Chih-Jen

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Y1 - 2014/1/22

N2 - Background: Tea has attracted considerable attention for its potential cardioprotective effects. The primary chemical components of tea are thought to have a beneficial effect by reducing arterial stiffness. The objective of this study was to assess the association between tea consumption and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in a relatively healthy Chinese population. Methods: We enrolled 3,135 apparently healthy subjects from October 2006 to August 2009. Subjects taking medication for diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia, or with a history of cardiovascular disease, were excluded from the study. The subjects were categorized into three groups according to their tea-drinking habits: (1) none to low (n = 1615), defined as non-habitual tea drinkers, or drinking for <1 year, or drinking ≤150 mL per day for ≥1 year ; (2) moderate tea consumption, defined as drinking for ≥1 year and consumption between 151 and 450 mL per day; and (3) heavy tea consumption, defined as a drinking for ≥1 year and consumption >450 mL per day. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine whether different levels of consumption were independently associated with the highest quartile of baPWV values, defined as ≥1428.5 cm/s. Results: Of the 3,135 subjects, 48.5% had drunk >150 mL of tea per day for at least 1 year. In multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for co-variables, including, age, sex, current smoking, alcohol use, habitual exercise, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TC/HDL-C) ratio >5, obesity, newly diagnosed hypertension and diabetes, subjects with high tea consumption had a decreased risk of highest quartile of baPWV by 22% (odds ratio = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.98, p = 0.032), while subjects with moderate tea consumption did not (p = 0.742), as compared subjects with none to low tea consumption. Conclusions: High, but not moderate, habitual tea consumption may decrease arterial stiffness.

AB - Background: Tea has attracted considerable attention for its potential cardioprotective effects. The primary chemical components of tea are thought to have a beneficial effect by reducing arterial stiffness. The objective of this study was to assess the association between tea consumption and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in a relatively healthy Chinese population. Methods: We enrolled 3,135 apparently healthy subjects from October 2006 to August 2009. Subjects taking medication for diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia, or with a history of cardiovascular disease, were excluded from the study. The subjects were categorized into three groups according to their tea-drinking habits: (1) none to low (n = 1615), defined as non-habitual tea drinkers, or drinking for <1 year, or drinking ≤150 mL per day for ≥1 year ; (2) moderate tea consumption, defined as drinking for ≥1 year and consumption between 151 and 450 mL per day; and (3) heavy tea consumption, defined as a drinking for ≥1 year and consumption >450 mL per day. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine whether different levels of consumption were independently associated with the highest quartile of baPWV values, defined as ≥1428.5 cm/s. Results: Of the 3,135 subjects, 48.5% had drunk >150 mL of tea per day for at least 1 year. In multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for co-variables, including, age, sex, current smoking, alcohol use, habitual exercise, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TC/HDL-C) ratio >5, obesity, newly diagnosed hypertension and diabetes, subjects with high tea consumption had a decreased risk of highest quartile of baPWV by 22% (odds ratio = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.98, p = 0.032), while subjects with moderate tea consumption did not (p = 0.742), as compared subjects with none to low tea consumption. Conclusions: High, but not moderate, habitual tea consumption may decrease arterial stiffness.

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