Influence of compressive strength and applied force in concrete on particles exposure concentrations during cutting processes

Jhy Charm Soo, Peng-Chi Tsai, Ching Hwa Chen, Mei Ru Chen, Hsin I. Hsu, Trong Neng Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this research was to identify the influence of applied force (AF) and the compressive strength (CS) of concrete on particle exposure concentrations during concrete cutting processes. Five cutting conditions were selected with AF varied between 9.8 and 49N and CS varied between 2500 and 6000psi. For each selected cutting condition, the measured total dust concentrations (Ctot) were used to further determine the corresponding three health-related exposure concentrations of the inhalable (Cinh), thoracic (Cthor), and respirable fraction (Cres). Results show that particle size distribution was consistently in a bimodal form under all selected cutting conditions. An increase in CS resulted in an increase in coarse particle generations leading to an increase in the four measured particle exposure levels. An increase in AF resulted in an increase in exposure concentrations with a higher fraction of fine particles (i.e., Ctho and Cres) However, for particle exposure concentrations with a higher fraction of coarse particles (i.e., Ctot and Cinh), an increase in AF resulted in an initial increase, followed by a decrease in concentration. Finally, the above inferences were further confirmed through the use of fixed-effect models to determine the influence of both CS and AF on the four exposure concentrations. These results provide a reference for industries to initiate appropriate control strategies to reduce the exposure levels encountered by workers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3124-3128
Number of pages5
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume409
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Aug 1

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compressive strength
Compressive strength
Concretes
Particle size analysis
Dust
Health
exposure
cutting (process)
particle
Industry
particle size
dust
industry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

Cite this

Soo, Jhy Charm ; Tsai, Peng-Chi ; Chen, Ching Hwa ; Chen, Mei Ru ; Hsu, Hsin I. ; Wu, Trong Neng. / Influence of compressive strength and applied force in concrete on particles exposure concentrations during cutting processes. In: Science of the Total Environment. 2011 ; Vol. 409, No. 17. pp. 3124-3128.
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Influence of compressive strength and applied force in concrete on particles exposure concentrations during cutting processes. / Soo, Jhy Charm; Tsai, Peng-Chi; Chen, Ching Hwa; Chen, Mei Ru; Hsu, Hsin I.; Wu, Trong Neng.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 409, No. 17, 01.08.2011, p. 3124-3128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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