Interaction of central obesity and sarcopenia on nutritional status in the community-dwelling older people

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Abstract

Objectives: To investigate the interrelationships between central obesity, sarcopenia and nutritional status in the elderly. Methods: We enrolled 501 elderly (women: 47.5 %) with complete datasets. Biochemical and anthropometric data were measured after an overnight fast. Basic characteristics, psychosocial and behavioral factors, nutritional status, and history of chronic disease came from structured questionnaires. Central obesity was defined as waist circumference ≥ 90 cm for men, ≥ 80 cm for women. Sarcopenia was defined by the Asian consensus. Nutritional status was assessed using Mini Nutritional Assessment scores: abnormal nutritional status ≤ 23.5. Multiple logistic regression analysis was done to determine the independent factors of an abnormal nutritional status. Results: Ninety (18.0 %) participants had an abnormal nutritional status, 300 (59.9 %) had central obesity, 52 (10.4 %) sarcopenia and 3 (0.6 %) sarcopenic obesity. Central obesity (OR = 0.455, 95 % CI: 0.244-0.847) and total lymphocyte count (OR = 0.526, 95 % CI: 0.315-0.880) were negatively and sarcopenia (OR = 3.170, 95 % CI: 1.485–6.767), current smoking (OR = 4.071, 95 % CI: 1.357–12.211), and total number of chronic diseases (OR = 1.484, 95 % CI: 1.234–1.785) were positively associated with abnormal nutritional status. An analysis of the combine effects of central obesity and sarcopenia on nutritional status showed that significantly fewer participants with central obesity but not sarcopenia had abnormal nutrition than participants with sarcopenia with or without central obesity (12.8 % vs 38.5 or 65.4 %, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Central obesity and sarcopenia were interactively associated with the nutritional status of older people living in a rural community.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104003
JournalArchives of gerontology and geriatrics
Volume87
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Mar 1

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Sarcopenia
Independent Living
Abdominal Obesity
Nutritional Status
interaction
community
Disease
rural community
nutrition
smoking
regression analysis
logistics
questionnaire
Chronic Disease
Nutrition Assessment
Lymphocyte Count
Waist Circumference
Rural Population
Consensus
Obesity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Ageing
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

@article{14abcc595960418295606826f8f44636,
title = "Interaction of central obesity and sarcopenia on nutritional status in the community-dwelling older people",
abstract = "Objectives: To investigate the interrelationships between central obesity, sarcopenia and nutritional status in the elderly. Methods: We enrolled 501 elderly (women: 47.5 {\%}) with complete datasets. Biochemical and anthropometric data were measured after an overnight fast. Basic characteristics, psychosocial and behavioral factors, nutritional status, and history of chronic disease came from structured questionnaires. Central obesity was defined as waist circumference ≥ 90 cm for men, ≥ 80 cm for women. Sarcopenia was defined by the Asian consensus. Nutritional status was assessed using Mini Nutritional Assessment scores: abnormal nutritional status ≤ 23.5. Multiple logistic regression analysis was done to determine the independent factors of an abnormal nutritional status. Results: Ninety (18.0 {\%}) participants had an abnormal nutritional status, 300 (59.9 {\%}) had central obesity, 52 (10.4 {\%}) sarcopenia and 3 (0.6 {\%}) sarcopenic obesity. Central obesity (OR = 0.455, 95 {\%} CI: 0.244-0.847) and total lymphocyte count (OR = 0.526, 95 {\%} CI: 0.315-0.880) were negatively and sarcopenia (OR = 3.170, 95 {\%} CI: 1.485–6.767), current smoking (OR = 4.071, 95 {\%} CI: 1.357–12.211), and total number of chronic diseases (OR = 1.484, 95 {\%} CI: 1.234–1.785) were positively associated with abnormal nutritional status. An analysis of the combine effects of central obesity and sarcopenia on nutritional status showed that significantly fewer participants with central obesity but not sarcopenia had abnormal nutrition than participants with sarcopenia with or without central obesity (12.8 {\%} vs 38.5 or 65.4 {\%}, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Central obesity and sarcopenia were interactively associated with the nutritional status of older people living in a rural community.",
author = "Chang, {Chin Sung} and Chang, {Yin Fan} and Liu, {Ping Yen} and Wu, {Shin Jiuan} and Chiu, {Ching Ju} and Chen, {Chuan Yu} and Wu, {Chih Hsing}",
year = "2020",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.archger.2019.104003",
language = "English",
volume = "87",
journal = "Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Interaction of central obesity and sarcopenia on nutritional status in the community-dwelling older people

AU - Chang, Chin Sung

AU - Chang, Yin Fan

AU - Liu, Ping Yen

AU - Wu, Shin Jiuan

AU - Chiu, Ching Ju

AU - Chen, Chuan Yu

AU - Wu, Chih Hsing

PY - 2020/3/1

Y1 - 2020/3/1

N2 - Objectives: To investigate the interrelationships between central obesity, sarcopenia and nutritional status in the elderly. Methods: We enrolled 501 elderly (women: 47.5 %) with complete datasets. Biochemical and anthropometric data were measured after an overnight fast. Basic characteristics, psychosocial and behavioral factors, nutritional status, and history of chronic disease came from structured questionnaires. Central obesity was defined as waist circumference ≥ 90 cm for men, ≥ 80 cm for women. Sarcopenia was defined by the Asian consensus. Nutritional status was assessed using Mini Nutritional Assessment scores: abnormal nutritional status ≤ 23.5. Multiple logistic regression analysis was done to determine the independent factors of an abnormal nutritional status. Results: Ninety (18.0 %) participants had an abnormal nutritional status, 300 (59.9 %) had central obesity, 52 (10.4 %) sarcopenia and 3 (0.6 %) sarcopenic obesity. Central obesity (OR = 0.455, 95 % CI: 0.244-0.847) and total lymphocyte count (OR = 0.526, 95 % CI: 0.315-0.880) were negatively and sarcopenia (OR = 3.170, 95 % CI: 1.485–6.767), current smoking (OR = 4.071, 95 % CI: 1.357–12.211), and total number of chronic diseases (OR = 1.484, 95 % CI: 1.234–1.785) were positively associated with abnormal nutritional status. An analysis of the combine effects of central obesity and sarcopenia on nutritional status showed that significantly fewer participants with central obesity but not sarcopenia had abnormal nutrition than participants with sarcopenia with or without central obesity (12.8 % vs 38.5 or 65.4 %, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Central obesity and sarcopenia were interactively associated with the nutritional status of older people living in a rural community.

AB - Objectives: To investigate the interrelationships between central obesity, sarcopenia and nutritional status in the elderly. Methods: We enrolled 501 elderly (women: 47.5 %) with complete datasets. Biochemical and anthropometric data were measured after an overnight fast. Basic characteristics, psychosocial and behavioral factors, nutritional status, and history of chronic disease came from structured questionnaires. Central obesity was defined as waist circumference ≥ 90 cm for men, ≥ 80 cm for women. Sarcopenia was defined by the Asian consensus. Nutritional status was assessed using Mini Nutritional Assessment scores: abnormal nutritional status ≤ 23.5. Multiple logistic regression analysis was done to determine the independent factors of an abnormal nutritional status. Results: Ninety (18.0 %) participants had an abnormal nutritional status, 300 (59.9 %) had central obesity, 52 (10.4 %) sarcopenia and 3 (0.6 %) sarcopenic obesity. Central obesity (OR = 0.455, 95 % CI: 0.244-0.847) and total lymphocyte count (OR = 0.526, 95 % CI: 0.315-0.880) were negatively and sarcopenia (OR = 3.170, 95 % CI: 1.485–6.767), current smoking (OR = 4.071, 95 % CI: 1.357–12.211), and total number of chronic diseases (OR = 1.484, 95 % CI: 1.234–1.785) were positively associated with abnormal nutritional status. An analysis of the combine effects of central obesity and sarcopenia on nutritional status showed that significantly fewer participants with central obesity but not sarcopenia had abnormal nutrition than participants with sarcopenia with or without central obesity (12.8 % vs 38.5 or 65.4 %, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Central obesity and sarcopenia were interactively associated with the nutritional status of older people living in a rural community.

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U2 - 10.1016/j.archger.2019.104003

DO - 10.1016/j.archger.2019.104003

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