Intravenous Thiamylal and Local Anesthetic Infiltration for Pediatric Facial Repair Procedures Performed in Emergency Departments

Ching Kuo Lin, Yu Wa Lau, Hon Man Chan, Fu Yuan Wang, Tzeng Jih Lin, Kuang I. Cheng, Yu Tung Feng, Chung Long Hung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Thiamylal is widely used for procedural sedation in emergency departments (ED); however, there are limited safety data for doses of thiamylal > 5 mg/kg in children. We investigated whether intravenous thiamylal in combination with local anesthetics is safe and effective for pediatric procedural sedation in the ED and to identify the association between increasing doses thiamylal and adverse events. Between July 2004 and June 2008, 227 children who underwent procedural sedation met the inclusion criteria, including 105 males (46.3%) and 122 females (53.7%). Facial laceration was the most common indication for procedural sedation. All children received an intravenous injection of thiamylal, with a loading dose of 5 mg/kg. Eighty-one children (35.7%) received a supplemental dose of 2.5 mg/kg thiamylal because of inadequate sedation. Of these, 27 (11.9%) received a second supplemental dose of 2.5 mg/kg because of inadequate sedation. Sixty-six patients (29.1%) experienced 75 mild and self-resolving adverse events, and most of which (15/75; 20%) were drowsiness. Four (1.8%) patients experienced oxygen saturation below 96%, which was related to the supplemental dose of thiamylal (p = 0.002). No children suffered from any lasting or potentially serious complications. Our results indicate that intravenous thiamylal in combination with local anesthetic infiltration is a well tolerated for therapeutic procedures in the ED. Thiamylal offers rapid onset of sedation without compromising the patient's cardiorespiratory function during pediatric procedural sedation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-199
Number of pages8
JournalKaohsiung Journal of Medical Sciences
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Apr

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Medicine

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