Is Self-Reported Height or Arm Span a More Accurate Alternative Measure of Height?

Jean K. Brown, Jui-Ying Feng, Thomas R. Knapp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether self-reported height or arm span is the more accurate alternative measure of height. A sample of 409 people between the ages of 19 and 67 (M = 35.0) participated in this anthropometric study. Height, self-reported height, and arm span were measured by 82 nursing research students. Mean differences from criterion measures were 0.17 cm for the measuring rules, 0.47 cm for arm span, and 0.85 cm and 0.87 cm for heights. Test-retest reliability was r =.997 for both height and arm span. The relationships of height to self-reported height and arm span were r =.97 and.90, respectively. Mean absolute differences were 1.80 cm and 4.29 cm, respectively. These findings support the practice of using self-reported height as an alternative measure of measured height in clinical settings, but arm span is an accurate alternative when neither measured height nor self-reported height is obtainable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)417-432
Number of pages16
JournalClinical Nursing Research
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Nursing Research
Nursing Students
Reproducibility of Results

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

@article{b94868b6f2984c47a21651924b4a5183,
title = "Is Self-Reported Height or Arm Span a More Accurate Alternative Measure of Height?",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to determine whether self-reported height or arm span is the more accurate alternative measure of height. A sample of 409 people between the ages of 19 and 67 (M = 35.0) participated in this anthropometric study. Height, self-reported height, and arm span were measured by 82 nursing research students. Mean differences from criterion measures were 0.17 cm for the measuring rules, 0.47 cm for arm span, and 0.85 cm and 0.87 cm for heights. Test-retest reliability was r =.997 for both height and arm span. The relationships of height to self-reported height and arm span were r =.97 and.90, respectively. Mean absolute differences were 1.80 cm and 4.29 cm, respectively. These findings support the practice of using self-reported height as an alternative measure of measured height in clinical settings, but arm span is an accurate alternative when neither measured height nor self-reported height is obtainable.",
author = "Brown, {Jean K.} and Jui-Ying Feng and Knapp, {Thomas R.}",
year = "2002",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/105477302237454",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "417--432",
journal = "Clinical Nursing Research",
issn = "1054-7738",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "4",

}

Is Self-Reported Height or Arm Span a More Accurate Alternative Measure of Height? / Brown, Jean K.; Feng, Jui-Ying; Knapp, Thomas R.

In: Clinical Nursing Research, Vol. 11, No. 4, 01.01.2002, p. 417-432.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is Self-Reported Height or Arm Span a More Accurate Alternative Measure of Height?

AU - Brown, Jean K.

AU - Feng, Jui-Ying

AU - Knapp, Thomas R.

PY - 2002/1/1

Y1 - 2002/1/1

N2 - The purpose of this study was to determine whether self-reported height or arm span is the more accurate alternative measure of height. A sample of 409 people between the ages of 19 and 67 (M = 35.0) participated in this anthropometric study. Height, self-reported height, and arm span were measured by 82 nursing research students. Mean differences from criterion measures were 0.17 cm for the measuring rules, 0.47 cm for arm span, and 0.85 cm and 0.87 cm for heights. Test-retest reliability was r =.997 for both height and arm span. The relationships of height to self-reported height and arm span were r =.97 and.90, respectively. Mean absolute differences were 1.80 cm and 4.29 cm, respectively. These findings support the practice of using self-reported height as an alternative measure of measured height in clinical settings, but arm span is an accurate alternative when neither measured height nor self-reported height is obtainable.

AB - The purpose of this study was to determine whether self-reported height or arm span is the more accurate alternative measure of height. A sample of 409 people between the ages of 19 and 67 (M = 35.0) participated in this anthropometric study. Height, self-reported height, and arm span were measured by 82 nursing research students. Mean differences from criterion measures were 0.17 cm for the measuring rules, 0.47 cm for arm span, and 0.85 cm and 0.87 cm for heights. Test-retest reliability was r =.997 for both height and arm span. The relationships of height to self-reported height and arm span were r =.97 and.90, respectively. Mean absolute differences were 1.80 cm and 4.29 cm, respectively. These findings support the practice of using self-reported height as an alternative measure of measured height in clinical settings, but arm span is an accurate alternative when neither measured height nor self-reported height is obtainable.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036835105&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036835105&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/105477302237454

DO - 10.1177/105477302237454

M3 - Article

C2 - 12413114

AN - SCOPUS:0036835105

VL - 11

SP - 417

EP - 432

JO - Clinical Nursing Research

JF - Clinical Nursing Research

SN - 1054-7738

IS - 4

ER -