Is the compression of tapered micro- and nanopillar samples a legitimate technique for the identification of deformation mode change in metallic glasses?

M. C. Liu, J. C. Huang, K. W. Chen, J. F. Lin, W. D. Li, Y. F. Gao, T. G. Nieh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In situ transmission electron microscopy compression was conducted on amorphous ZrCu nanopillars, 140 nm in diameter and with a taper angle. The aspect ratio of nanopillars is over 6. Experimental observations and simulations both demonstrate that the deformation is localized near the top of the tapered metallic glass pillar, in sharp contrast to pillars of classic Mises plastic solids, which exhibit typical barreling behavior in compression. Localized shear bands appear to be absent, but they form inside the tapered samples.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)817-820
Number of pages4
JournalScripta Materialia
Volume66
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 May 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Metals and Alloys

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Is the compression of tapered micro- and nanopillar samples a legitimate technique for the identification of deformation mode change in metallic glasses?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this