Life prediction of solder joints by damage and fracture mechanics

Shen-Haw Ju, B. I. Sandor, M. E. Plesha

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Much research has been done on Surface Mount Technology (SMT) using the Finite Element Method (FEM). Little of this, however, has employed fracture mechanics and/or continuum damage mechanics. In this study, we propose two finite element approaches incorporating fracture mechanics and continuum damage mechanics to predict time-dependent and temperature-dependent fatigue life of solder joints. For fracture mechanics, the J-integral fatigue formula, da/dN= C (ΔJ)m, is used to quantify fatigue crack growth and the fatigue life of J-leaded solder joints. For continuum damage mechanics, the anisotropic creep-fatigue damage formula with partially reversible damage effects is used to find the initial crack, crack growth path and fatigue life of solder joints. The concept of partially reversible damage is especially novel and, based on laboratory tests we have conducted, appears to be necessary for solder joints undergoing cyclic loading. Both of these methods are adequate to predict the fatigue life of solder joints. The advantage of the fracture mechanics approach is that little computer time is required. Its disadvantage is that assumptions must be made on the initial crack position and the crack growth path. The advantage of continuum damage mechanics is that the initial crack and its growth path are automatically evaluated, with the temporary disadvantage of requiring much computer time.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationStructural Analysis in Microelectronics and Fiber Optics
EditorsLuu T. Nguyen, Michael G. Pecht
PublisherPubl by ASME
Pages105-111
Number of pages7
Volume7
ISBN (Print)0791812588
Publication statusPublished - 1993
EventProceedings of the 1993 ASME Winter Annual Meeting - New Orleans, LA, USA
Duration: 1993 Nov 281993 Dec 3

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1993 ASME Winter Annual Meeting
CityNew Orleans, LA, USA
Period93-11-2893-12-03

Fingerprint

Continuum damage mechanics
Fracture mechanics
Soldering alloys
Fatigue of materials
Cracks
Crack propagation
Surface mount technology
Fatigue damage
Fatigue crack propagation
Creep
Finite element method
Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Ju, S-H., Sandor, B. I., & Plesha, M. E. (1993). Life prediction of solder joints by damage and fracture mechanics. In L. T. Nguyen, & M. G. Pecht (Eds.), Structural Analysis in Microelectronics and Fiber Optics (Vol. 7, pp. 105-111). Publ by ASME.
Ju, Shen-Haw ; Sandor, B. I. ; Plesha, M. E. / Life prediction of solder joints by damage and fracture mechanics. Structural Analysis in Microelectronics and Fiber Optics. editor / Luu T. Nguyen ; Michael G. Pecht. Vol. 7 Publ by ASME, 1993. pp. 105-111
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Ju, S-H, Sandor, BI & Plesha, ME 1993, Life prediction of solder joints by damage and fracture mechanics. in LT Nguyen & MG Pecht (eds), Structural Analysis in Microelectronics and Fiber Optics. vol. 7, Publ by ASME, pp. 105-111, Proceedings of the 1993 ASME Winter Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, USA, 93-11-28.

Life prediction of solder joints by damage and fracture mechanics. / Ju, Shen-Haw; Sandor, B. I.; Plesha, M. E.

Structural Analysis in Microelectronics and Fiber Optics. ed. / Luu T. Nguyen; Michael G. Pecht. Vol. 7 Publ by ASME, 1993. p. 105-111.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Ju S-H, Sandor BI, Plesha ME. Life prediction of solder joints by damage and fracture mechanics. In Nguyen LT, Pecht MG, editors, Structural Analysis in Microelectronics and Fiber Optics. Vol. 7. Publ by ASME. 1993. p. 105-111