Measurement of indirect tensile strength of anisotropic rocks by the ring test

Chao-Shi Chen, S. C. Hsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents a new approach, combined with the Boundary Element Method (BEM) analysis and the diametrical compression on a thin disc with a small central hole, referred to as the ring test, for determining the indirect tensile strength of anisotropic rocks. The stress distribution around the hole can be successfully obtained by the proposed single-domain BEM. The complex variable function method was used for conveniently computing the tractions and displacements of a two-dimensional anisotropic body. If we assume that the tensile strength is given by the maximum absolute value of stress in the direction perpendicular to the loaded diameter at the intersection of loaded diameter and the hole, then from the failure load recorded by laboratory testing of ring (disc), the indirect tensile strength of rocks could be obtained. A marble from Hualien (Taiwan) with clearly black-white foliation, which was assumed to be transversely isotropic, was selected to conduct both ring tests and Brazilian tests for evaluating the tensile strength. The variation of the marble tensile strength with the inclination angle of foliation and with the hole size was also investigated. In general, the tensile strength of anisotropic rocks determined by ring test is not a constant, but depends on the elastic properties of rocks, the angle between the planes of rock anisotropy and the loading direction, the diameter of the central hole, and the contact condition of loading.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-321
Number of pages29
JournalRock Mechanics and Rock Engineering
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001 Dec 1

Fingerprint

tensile strength
Tensile strength
Rocks
rock
Marble
boundary element method
Boundary element method
foliation
marble
Brazilian test
elastic property
test
Stress concentration
Anisotropy
anisotropy
compression
Testing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Geology

Cite this

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Measurement of indirect tensile strength of anisotropic rocks by the ring test. / Chen, Chao-Shi; Hsu, S. C.

In: Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.12.2001, p. 293-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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