Measuring the ability of military aircrews to adapt to perceived stressors when undergoing centrifuge training.

Jenhung Wang, Pei Chun Lin, Shih Chin Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study assessed the ability of military aircrews to adapt to stressors when undergoing centrifuge training and determined what equipment items caused perceived stress and needed to be upgraded. We used questionnaires and the Rasch model to measure aircrew personnel's ability to adapt to centrifuge training. The measurement items were ranked by 611 military aircrew personnel. Analytical results indicated that the majority of the stress perceived by aircrew personnel resulted from the lightproof cockpit without outer reference. This study prioritized the equipment requiring updating as the lightproof cockpit design, the dim lighting of the cockpit, and the pedal design. A significant difference was found between pilot and non-pilot subjects' stress from the pedal design; and considerable association was discernible between the seat angle design and flight hours accrued. The study results provide aviators, astronauts, and air forces with reliable information as to which equipment items need to be urgently upgraded as their present physiological and psychological effects can affect the effectiveness of centrifuge training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)200-212
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of applied measurement
Volume15
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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