Mechanical behavior of artificial anisotropic rock masses

Y. M. Tien, C. Y. Wang, C. H. Juang, Der-Her Lee

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper presents results of a series of uniaxial and triaxial tests on specimens prepared from artificial anisotropic rock blocks created by high-pressure compaction of layers of different mixtures of cement, sand, microsilica and kaolinite. Artificial anisotropic rock specimens were cored with different dip angles from interlayered and stratified blocks. The Young's moduli of rock masses with different dip angle were simulated using the imperfectly bonded interface constitutive law developed by Tien et al. (1995). The simulation results based on the imperfect bonded models agreed well with the experimental results.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationVail Rocks 1999 - 37th U.S. Symposium on Rock Mechanics (USRMS)
Editors Kranz, Smeallie, Scott, Amadei
PublisherAmerican Rock Mechanics Association (ARMA)
Pages357-363
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)9058090523, 9789058090522
Publication statusPublished - 1999 Jan 1
Event37th U.S. Symposium on Rock Mechanics, Vail Rocks 1999 - Vail, United States
Duration: 1999 Jun 71999 Jun 9

Publication series

NameVail Rocks 1999 - 37th U.S. Symposium on Rock Mechanics (USRMS)

Conference

Conference37th U.S. Symposium on Rock Mechanics, Vail Rocks 1999
CountryUnited States
CityVail
Period99-06-0799-06-09

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics

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  • Cite this

    Tien, Y. M., Wang, C. Y., Juang, C. H., & Lee, D-H. (1999). Mechanical behavior of artificial anisotropic rock masses. In Kranz, Smeallie, Scott, & Amadei (Eds.), Vail Rocks 1999 - 37th U.S. Symposium on Rock Mechanics (USRMS) (pp. 357-363). (Vail Rocks 1999 - 37th U.S. Symposium on Rock Mechanics (USRMS)). American Rock Mechanics Association (ARMA).