Mechanical coupling of cytoskeletal elasticity and force generation is crucial for understanding the migrating nature of keloid fibroblasts

Hans I.Chen Harn, Yang Kao Wang, Chao Kai Hsu, Yen Ting Ho, Yi Wei Huang, Wen Tai Chiu, Hsi Hui Lin, Chao Min Cheng, Ming Jer Tang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the key features of keloid is its fibroblasts migrating beyond the original wound border. During migration, cells not only undergo molecular changes but also mechanical modulation. This process is led by actin filaments serving as the backbone of intra-cellular force and transduces external mechanical signal via focal adhesion complex into the cell. Here, we focus on determining the mechanical changes of actin filaments and the spatial distribution of forces in response to changing chemical stimulations and during cell migration. Atomic force microscopy and micropost array detector are used to determine and compare the magnitude and distribution of filament elasticity and force generation in fibroblasts and keloid fibroblasts. We found both filament elasticity and force generation show spatial distribution in a polarized and migrating cell. Such spatial distribution is disrupted when mechano-signalling is perturbed by focal adhesion kinase inhibitor and in keloid fibroblasts. The demonstration of keloid pathology at the nanoscale highlights the coupling of cytoskeletal function with physical characters at the subcellular level and provides new research directions for migration-related disease such as keloid.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)579-584
Number of pages6
JournalExperimental Dermatology
Volume24
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Aug 1

Fingerprint

Keloid
Elasticity
Fibroblasts
Spatial distribution
Actins
Actin Cytoskeleton
Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Chemical Stimulation
Pathology
Focal Adhesions
Atomic Force Microscopy
Atomic force microscopy
Demonstrations
Adhesion
Modulation
Cell Movement
Detectors
Wounds and Injuries
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Dermatology

Cite this

@article{246124ee79c24a599bbe8156ae2d8a07,
title = "Mechanical coupling of cytoskeletal elasticity and force generation is crucial for understanding the migrating nature of keloid fibroblasts",
abstract = "One of the key features of keloid is its fibroblasts migrating beyond the original wound border. During migration, cells not only undergo molecular changes but also mechanical modulation. This process is led by actin filaments serving as the backbone of intra-cellular force and transduces external mechanical signal via focal adhesion complex into the cell. Here, we focus on determining the mechanical changes of actin filaments and the spatial distribution of forces in response to changing chemical stimulations and during cell migration. Atomic force microscopy and micropost array detector are used to determine and compare the magnitude and distribution of filament elasticity and force generation in fibroblasts and keloid fibroblasts. We found both filament elasticity and force generation show spatial distribution in a polarized and migrating cell. Such spatial distribution is disrupted when mechano-signalling is perturbed by focal adhesion kinase inhibitor and in keloid fibroblasts. The demonstration of keloid pathology at the nanoscale highlights the coupling of cytoskeletal function with physical characters at the subcellular level and provides new research directions for migration-related disease such as keloid.",
author = "Harn, {Hans I.Chen} and Wang, {Yang Kao} and Hsu, {Chao Kai} and Ho, {Yen Ting} and Huang, {Yi Wei} and Chiu, {Wen Tai} and Lin, {Hsi Hui} and Cheng, {Chao Min} and Tang, {Ming Jer}",
year = "2015",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/exd.12731",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "579--584",
journal = "Experimental Dermatology",
issn = "0906-6705",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mechanical coupling of cytoskeletal elasticity and force generation is crucial for understanding the migrating nature of keloid fibroblasts

AU - Harn, Hans I.Chen

AU - Wang, Yang Kao

AU - Hsu, Chao Kai

AU - Ho, Yen Ting

AU - Huang, Yi Wei

AU - Chiu, Wen Tai

AU - Lin, Hsi Hui

AU - Cheng, Chao Min

AU - Tang, Ming Jer

PY - 2015/8/1

Y1 - 2015/8/1

N2 - One of the key features of keloid is its fibroblasts migrating beyond the original wound border. During migration, cells not only undergo molecular changes but also mechanical modulation. This process is led by actin filaments serving as the backbone of intra-cellular force and transduces external mechanical signal via focal adhesion complex into the cell. Here, we focus on determining the mechanical changes of actin filaments and the spatial distribution of forces in response to changing chemical stimulations and during cell migration. Atomic force microscopy and micropost array detector are used to determine and compare the magnitude and distribution of filament elasticity and force generation in fibroblasts and keloid fibroblasts. We found both filament elasticity and force generation show spatial distribution in a polarized and migrating cell. Such spatial distribution is disrupted when mechano-signalling is perturbed by focal adhesion kinase inhibitor and in keloid fibroblasts. The demonstration of keloid pathology at the nanoscale highlights the coupling of cytoskeletal function with physical characters at the subcellular level and provides new research directions for migration-related disease such as keloid.

AB - One of the key features of keloid is its fibroblasts migrating beyond the original wound border. During migration, cells not only undergo molecular changes but also mechanical modulation. This process is led by actin filaments serving as the backbone of intra-cellular force and transduces external mechanical signal via focal adhesion complex into the cell. Here, we focus on determining the mechanical changes of actin filaments and the spatial distribution of forces in response to changing chemical stimulations and during cell migration. Atomic force microscopy and micropost array detector are used to determine and compare the magnitude and distribution of filament elasticity and force generation in fibroblasts and keloid fibroblasts. We found both filament elasticity and force generation show spatial distribution in a polarized and migrating cell. Such spatial distribution is disrupted when mechano-signalling is perturbed by focal adhesion kinase inhibitor and in keloid fibroblasts. The demonstration of keloid pathology at the nanoscale highlights the coupling of cytoskeletal function with physical characters at the subcellular level and provides new research directions for migration-related disease such as keloid.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84937974458&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84937974458&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/exd.12731

DO - 10.1111/exd.12731

M3 - Article

C2 - 25877039

AN - SCOPUS:84937974458

VL - 24

SP - 579

EP - 584

JO - Experimental Dermatology

JF - Experimental Dermatology

SN - 0906-6705

IS - 8

ER -