Mediated effects of eating disturbances in the association of perceived weight stigma and emotional distress

Chung Ying Lin, Carol Strong, Janet D. Latner, Yi Ching Lin, Meng Che Tsai, Pauline Cheung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study aimed to examine the relationships between perceived weight stigma, eating disturbances, and emotional distress across individuals with different self-perceived weight status. Methods: University students from Hong Kong (n = 400) and Taiwan (n = 307) participated in this study and completed several questionnaires: Perceived Weight Stigma questionnaire; Three-factor Eating Questionnaire; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Each participant self-reported their height, weight, and self-perceived weight status. Results: After controlling for demographics, perceived weight stigma was associated with eating disturbances (β = 0.223, p < 0.001), depression (β = 0.143, p < 0.001), and anxiety (β = 0.193, p < 0.001); and eating disturbances was associated with depression (β = 0.147, p < 0.001) and anxiety (β = 0.300, p < 0.001) in the whole sample. Additionally, eating disturbances mediated the association between perceived weight stigma and emotional distress. Similar findings were shown in the subsamples who perceived themselves as higher weight or normal weight and in the male and female subsamples. However, in the subsamples who perceived themselves as lower weight, only the links between eating disturbances and emotional distress were significant. Conclusion: Perceived weight stigma was associated with eating disturbances and emotional distress in young adults with both higher and normal weight. Eating disturbances were associated with emotional distress regardless of participants’ weight status. Level of evidence: Level V, cross-sectional descriptive study.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEating and Weight Disorders
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Eating
Weights and Measures
Anxiety
Depression
Hong Kong
Taiwan
Young Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "Mediated effects of eating disturbances in the association of perceived weight stigma and emotional distress",
abstract = "Purpose: This study aimed to examine the relationships between perceived weight stigma, eating disturbances, and emotional distress across individuals with different self-perceived weight status. Methods: University students from Hong Kong (n = 400) and Taiwan (n = 307) participated in this study and completed several questionnaires: Perceived Weight Stigma questionnaire; Three-factor Eating Questionnaire; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Each participant self-reported their height, weight, and self-perceived weight status. Results: After controlling for demographics, perceived weight stigma was associated with eating disturbances (β = 0.223, p < 0.001), depression (β = 0.143, p < 0.001), and anxiety (β = 0.193, p < 0.001); and eating disturbances was associated with depression (β = 0.147, p < 0.001) and anxiety (β = 0.300, p < 0.001) in the whole sample. Additionally, eating disturbances mediated the association between perceived weight stigma and emotional distress. Similar findings were shown in the subsamples who perceived themselves as higher weight or normal weight and in the male and female subsamples. However, in the subsamples who perceived themselves as lower weight, only the links between eating disturbances and emotional distress were significant. Conclusion: Perceived weight stigma was associated with eating disturbances and emotional distress in young adults with both higher and normal weight. Eating disturbances were associated with emotional distress regardless of participants’ weight status. Level of evidence: Level V, cross-sectional descriptive study.",
author = "Lin, {Chung Ying} and Carol Strong and Latner, {Janet D.} and Lin, {Yi Ching} and Tsai, {Meng Che} and Pauline Cheung",
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Mediated effects of eating disturbances in the association of perceived weight stigma and emotional distress. / Lin, Chung Ying; Strong, Carol; Latner, Janet D.; Lin, Yi Ching; Tsai, Meng Che; Cheung, Pauline.

In: Eating and Weight Disorders, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Cheung, Pauline

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