Microfluidic gas purge valves

Han-Sheng Chuang, Steven T. Wereley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We present two PDMS-based gas purge valves for general lab-on-a-chip applications. The valves are devised based on a three-layer configuration comprising a top layer for fluid channels, a membrane, and a bottom layer for gas channels. The pneumatic valves work as a normal gateway for fluids when the membrane is bulged down (open state) or up (closed state) by vacuum or pressure, respectively. In a closed state, the residual gas in front of a fluid can be eliminated through a small notch or a permeable PDMS membrane by simply pumping the fluid. The purge valve with a small notch, termed surface-tension enable valve (ST valve), can resist pressure under 5.5 kPa. The liquid is retained by the surface tension force resulting from the surrounding hydrophobic walls. In contrast, the purge valve with vacuum grooves above the [fluid channel, termed gas-permeation enable valve (GP valve), can resist pressure higher than 5.5 kPa. Based on permeation principle, the unwanted gas can slowly escape from the fluid channel through the PDMS membrane. The unique purge valves enable users to passively align fluids at the desire locations without actively sensing or having a feedback loop. A mixing process was successfully performed with the GP valves, showing their potential applications in microfluidics.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ASME Micro/Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer International Conference 2009, MNHMT2009
Pages375-378
Number of pages4
Volume1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventASME 2009 Micro/Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer International Conference 2009, MNHMT2009 - Shanghai, China
Duration: 2009 Dec 182009 Dec 21

Other

OtherASME 2009 Micro/Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer International Conference 2009, MNHMT2009
CountryChina
CityShanghai
Period09-12-1809-12-21

Fingerprint

Microfluidics
Gases
Fluids
Membranes
Permeation
Surface tension
Vacuum
Lab-on-a-chip
Pneumatics
Feedback
Liquids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes

Cite this

Chuang, H-S., & Wereley, S. T. (2010). Microfluidic gas purge valves. In Proceedings of the ASME Micro/Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer International Conference 2009, MNHMT2009 (Vol. 1, pp. 375-378) https://doi.org/10.1115/MNHMT2009-18534
Chuang, Han-Sheng ; Wereley, Steven T. / Microfluidic gas purge valves. Proceedings of the ASME Micro/Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer International Conference 2009, MNHMT2009. Vol. 1 2010. pp. 375-378
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Chuang, H-S & Wereley, ST 2010, Microfluidic gas purge valves. in Proceedings of the ASME Micro/Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer International Conference 2009, MNHMT2009. vol. 1, pp. 375-378, ASME 2009 Micro/Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer International Conference 2009, MNHMT2009, Shanghai, China, 09-12-18. https://doi.org/10.1115/MNHMT2009-18534

Microfluidic gas purge valves. / Chuang, Han-Sheng; Wereley, Steven T.

Proceedings of the ASME Micro/Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer International Conference 2009, MNHMT2009. Vol. 1 2010. p. 375-378.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Chuang H-S, Wereley ST. Microfluidic gas purge valves. In Proceedings of the ASME Micro/Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer International Conference 2009, MNHMT2009. Vol. 1. 2010. p. 375-378 https://doi.org/10.1115/MNHMT2009-18534