Microsurgical anatomy of the internal acoustic meatus as seen using the retrosigmoid approach

Alba Scerrati, Jung-Shun Lee, Jun Zhang, Mario Ammirati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hypothesis: To show via a retrosigmoid approach the bony labyrinth anatomy and its relationship with the internal acoustic meatus so as to provide guidelines for a safer drilling to the fundus using this approach. Background: Few studies deal with the complex anatomy of petrous bone structures as observed by a retrosigmoid approach. Methods: Ten retrosigmoid approaches were performed bilaterally on five fresh cadaveric heads. Afterward highresolution computed tomographic scans were obtained. Measurements of landmarks and distances between important topographic structures of the pyramid were obtained on its surface using a navigation system. Semicircular canals, vestibular aqueduct, and internal acoustic meatus were dissected to show their anatomy and relationships. Results: The anatomy of the inner ear structures was shown. Opening of the internal acoustic meatus was accomplished without injury to the labyrinth in 9 out of 10 sides. The distance between the drilled bone of the internal acoustic meatus and the vestibule was calculated on the postoperative computed tomographic scan. The mean value was 1.43mm (SD, 0.30 mm; range, 1.0-1.8 mm). Conclusion: A better knowledge of the anatomy of the semicircular canals and of the vestibular aqueduct as observed by a retrosigmoid approach, together with their relationships to the fundus and other petrous bone landmarks, can be useful to get a general orientation in acoustic neuroma surgery. Using this information together with the neuronavigation, we were able to successfully open the internal acoustic meatus without entering labyrinthine structures in 90% of the study dissections.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)568-573
Number of pages6
JournalOtology and Neurotology
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jun 1

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Acoustics
Anatomy
Inner Ear
Vestibular Aqueduct
Petrous Bone
Semicircular Canals
Neuronavigation
Acoustic Neuroma
Dissection
Head
Guidelines
Bone and Bones
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Scerrati, Alba ; Lee, Jung-Shun ; Zhang, Jun ; Ammirati, Mario. / Microsurgical anatomy of the internal acoustic meatus as seen using the retrosigmoid approach. In: Otology and Neurotology. 2016 ; Vol. 37, No. 5. pp. 568-573.
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Microsurgical anatomy of the internal acoustic meatus as seen using the retrosigmoid approach. / Scerrati, Alba; Lee, Jung-Shun; Zhang, Jun; Ammirati, Mario.

In: Otology and Neurotology, Vol. 37, No. 5, 01.06.2016, p. 568-573.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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