Minimally invasive approaches increase postoperative complications in obese patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy during the initial development period: a propensity score matching study

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Abstract

Background: Obesity increases surgical risks in various abdominal surgeries and its impact on open pancreaticoduodenectomy (OPD) and minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy (MIPD) remains unknown. This study aimed to compare the surgical outcomes of OPD and MIPD in obese and non-obese patients by propensity score matching (PSM) analysis during the implementation of MIPD. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all pancreaticoduodenectomies from December 2014 to May 2021. Obesity was defined as body mass index > 25 kg/m2 according to World Health Organization International Obesity Task Force. PSM was used to minimize the selection bias of MIPD. Results: Among 462 pancreaticoduodenectomies (339 OPDs, 123 MIPDs), there were 313 patients in the non-obese group (MIPD: 78, OPD: 235) and 149 patients in the obese group (MIPD: 45, OPD: 104). After PSM, there were 70 MIPD/106 OPD patients in the non-obese group and 38 MIPD/54 OPD patients in the obese group. The obese MIPD patients had more fluid collection (36.8% vs 9.8%, p = 0.002), a higher Clavien–Dindo (CD) grade (p = 0.007), more major complications (42.1% vs 14.8%, p = 0.004), and longer operative times (306 min vs 264 min, p < 0.001) than the obese OPD patients. The non-obese MIPD patients had lower CD grades (p = 0.02), longer operative times (294 vs 264 min, p < 0.001), and less blood loss (100 mL vs 200 mL) than the non-obese OPD patients. MIPD was a strong predictor of major complication (CD ≥ 3) in obese patients (odds ratio 3.11, 95% CI: 1.40–6.95, p = 0.005). Conclusions: Minimally invasive approaches deteriorate the CD grade, fluid collection, and major complications in obese patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy during the initial development period. Non-obese patients may benefit from MIPD over OPD in terms of less blood loss and lower CD grades. The impact of BMI on MIPD should be considered when assessing the surgical risks. Graphical abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.]

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2770-2780
Number of pages11
JournalSurgical Endoscopy
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023 Apr

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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