National health data linkage and the agreement between self-reports and medical records for middle-aged and older adults in Taiwan 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1117 Public Health and Health Services 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1103 Clinical Sciences

Ching-Ju Chiu, Hsiang Min Huang, Tsung-Hsueh Lu, Ying Wei Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Characteristics associated with acceptance of dataset linkages and health data linkage data quality were analyzed. Methods: Participants from the 2011 Taiwan Longitudinal Study on Aging were asked to link their epidemiological data with concurrent and future medical claim datasets. Characteristics associated with acceptance of data linkage, data consistency, under-reporting, and over-reporting of disease conditions were identified. Results: Among the 3727 respondents, 3601 (96.6%) accepted data linkage. Middle-aged adults with worse functional health accepted data linkage. Older adults (65+) with better health behavior and social support were more likely to accept data linkage. Consistency between self-reports and medical data was very good to satisfactory (Kappa = 0.80 and 0.67, respectively, for diabetes and hypertension). Comorbidities were common risk factors resulting in inconsistency between self-reports and medical data (OR = 1.58 and 1.27, respectively, for diabetes and hypertension). Living alone was another risk factor resulting in inconsistency for diabetes. Male, older, and not living alone were other risk factors resulting in inconsistencies for hypertension. Under-reporting of illness was associated with poor health and older age. Over-reporting of illness was associated with better health and younger age. Discussion: The findings suggest different adjustment methods for middle-aged versus older respondents when considering self-report data validity.

Original languageEnglish
Article number917
JournalBMC Health Services Research
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Dec 3

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Information Storage and Retrieval
Taiwan
Self Report
Health Services
Medical Records
Public Health
Health
Hypertension
Social Adjustment
Health Behavior
Social Support
Longitudinal Studies
Comorbidity
Surveys and Questionnaires
Datasets

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy

Cite this

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title = "National health data linkage and the agreement between self-reports and medical records for middle-aged and older adults in Taiwan 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1117 Public Health and Health Services 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1103 Clinical Sciences",
abstract = "Background: Characteristics associated with acceptance of dataset linkages and health data linkage data quality were analyzed. Methods: Participants from the 2011 Taiwan Longitudinal Study on Aging were asked to link their epidemiological data with concurrent and future medical claim datasets. Characteristics associated with acceptance of data linkage, data consistency, under-reporting, and over-reporting of disease conditions were identified. Results: Among the 3727 respondents, 3601 (96.6{\%}) accepted data linkage. Middle-aged adults with worse functional health accepted data linkage. Older adults (65+) with better health behavior and social support were more likely to accept data linkage. Consistency between self-reports and medical data was very good to satisfactory (Kappa = 0.80 and 0.67, respectively, for diabetes and hypertension). Comorbidities were common risk factors resulting in inconsistency between self-reports and medical data (OR = 1.58 and 1.27, respectively, for diabetes and hypertension). Living alone was another risk factor resulting in inconsistency for diabetes. Male, older, and not living alone were other risk factors resulting in inconsistencies for hypertension. Under-reporting of illness was associated with poor health and older age. Over-reporting of illness was associated with better health and younger age. Discussion: The findings suggest different adjustment methods for middle-aged versus older respondents when considering self-report data validity.",
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AU - Lu, Tsung-Hsueh

AU - Wang, Ying Wei

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N2 - Background: Characteristics associated with acceptance of dataset linkages and health data linkage data quality were analyzed. Methods: Participants from the 2011 Taiwan Longitudinal Study on Aging were asked to link their epidemiological data with concurrent and future medical claim datasets. Characteristics associated with acceptance of data linkage, data consistency, under-reporting, and over-reporting of disease conditions were identified. Results: Among the 3727 respondents, 3601 (96.6%) accepted data linkage. Middle-aged adults with worse functional health accepted data linkage. Older adults (65+) with better health behavior and social support were more likely to accept data linkage. Consistency between self-reports and medical data was very good to satisfactory (Kappa = 0.80 and 0.67, respectively, for diabetes and hypertension). Comorbidities were common risk factors resulting in inconsistency between self-reports and medical data (OR = 1.58 and 1.27, respectively, for diabetes and hypertension). Living alone was another risk factor resulting in inconsistency for diabetes. Male, older, and not living alone were other risk factors resulting in inconsistencies for hypertension. Under-reporting of illness was associated with poor health and older age. Over-reporting of illness was associated with better health and younger age. Discussion: The findings suggest different adjustment methods for middle-aged versus older respondents when considering self-report data validity.

AB - Background: Characteristics associated with acceptance of dataset linkages and health data linkage data quality were analyzed. Methods: Participants from the 2011 Taiwan Longitudinal Study on Aging were asked to link their epidemiological data with concurrent and future medical claim datasets. Characteristics associated with acceptance of data linkage, data consistency, under-reporting, and over-reporting of disease conditions were identified. Results: Among the 3727 respondents, 3601 (96.6%) accepted data linkage. Middle-aged adults with worse functional health accepted data linkage. Older adults (65+) with better health behavior and social support were more likely to accept data linkage. Consistency between self-reports and medical data was very good to satisfactory (Kappa = 0.80 and 0.67, respectively, for diabetes and hypertension). Comorbidities were common risk factors resulting in inconsistency between self-reports and medical data (OR = 1.58 and 1.27, respectively, for diabetes and hypertension). Living alone was another risk factor resulting in inconsistency for diabetes. Male, older, and not living alone were other risk factors resulting in inconsistencies for hypertension. Under-reporting of illness was associated with poor health and older age. Over-reporting of illness was associated with better health and younger age. Discussion: The findings suggest different adjustment methods for middle-aged versus older respondents when considering self-report data validity.

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