Neural basis of postural focus effect on concurrent postural and motor tasks

Phase-locked electroencephalogram responses

Cheng Ya Huang, Chen Guang Zhao, Ing-Shiou Hwang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dual-task performance is strongly affected by the direction of attentional focus. This study investigated neural control of a postural-suprapostural procedure when postural focus strategy varied. Twelve adults concurrently conducted force-matching and maintained stabilometer stance with visual feedback on ankle movement (visual internal focus, VIF) and on stabilometer movement (visual external focus, VEF). Force-matching error, dynamics of ankle and stabilometer movements, and event-related potentials (ERPs) were registered. Postural control with VEF caused superior force-matching performance, more complex ankle movement, and stronger kinematic coupling between the ankle and stabilometer movements than postural control with VIF. The postural focus strategy also altered ERP temporal-spatial patterns. Postural control with VEF resulted in later N1 with less negativity around the bilateral fronto-central and contralateral sensorimotor areas, earlier P2 deflection with more positivity around the bilateral fronto-central and ipsilateral temporal areas, and late movement-related potential commencing in the left frontal-central area, as compared with postural control with VIF. The time-frequency distribution of the ERP principal component revealed phase-locked neural oscillations in the delta (1-4. Hz), theta (4-7. Hz), and beta (13-35. Hz) rhythms. The delta and theta rhythms were more pronounced prior to the timing of P2 positive deflection, and beta rebound was greater after the completion of force-matching in VEF condition than VIF condition. This study is the first to reveal the neural correlation of postural focusing effect on a postural-suprapostural task. Postural control with VEF takes advantage of efficient task-switching to facilitate autonomous postural response, in agreement with the "constrained-action" hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-107
Number of pages13
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume274
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Nov 1

Fingerprint

Ankle
Electroencephalography
Evoked Potentials
Delta Rhythm
Theta Rhythm
Sensory Feedback
Task Performance and Analysis
Biomechanical Phenomena

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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abstract = "Dual-task performance is strongly affected by the direction of attentional focus. This study investigated neural control of a postural-suprapostural procedure when postural focus strategy varied. Twelve adults concurrently conducted force-matching and maintained stabilometer stance with visual feedback on ankle movement (visual internal focus, VIF) and on stabilometer movement (visual external focus, VEF). Force-matching error, dynamics of ankle and stabilometer movements, and event-related potentials (ERPs) were registered. Postural control with VEF caused superior force-matching performance, more complex ankle movement, and stronger kinematic coupling between the ankle and stabilometer movements than postural control with VIF. The postural focus strategy also altered ERP temporal-spatial patterns. Postural control with VEF resulted in later N1 with less negativity around the bilateral fronto-central and contralateral sensorimotor areas, earlier P2 deflection with more positivity around the bilateral fronto-central and ipsilateral temporal areas, and late movement-related potential commencing in the left frontal-central area, as compared with postural control with VIF. The time-frequency distribution of the ERP principal component revealed phase-locked neural oscillations in the delta (1-4. Hz), theta (4-7. Hz), and beta (13-35. Hz) rhythms. The delta and theta rhythms were more pronounced prior to the timing of P2 positive deflection, and beta rebound was greater after the completion of force-matching in VEF condition than VIF condition. This study is the first to reveal the neural correlation of postural focusing effect on a postural-suprapostural task. Postural control with VEF takes advantage of efficient task-switching to facilitate autonomous postural response, in agreement with the {"}constrained-action{"} hypothesis.",
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Neural basis of postural focus effect on concurrent postural and motor tasks : Phase-locked electroencephalogram responses. / Huang, Cheng Ya; Zhao, Chen Guang; Hwang, Ing-Shiou.

In: Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 274, 01.11.2014, p. 95-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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