Neuroimaging of the joint Simon effect with believed biological and non-biological co-actors

Tanya Wen, ShuLan Hsieh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Performing a task alone or together with another agent can produce different outcomes. The current study used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural underpinnings when participants performed a Go/Nogo task alone or complementarily with another co-actor (unseen), whom was believed to be another human or a computer. During both complementary tasks, reaction time data suggested that participants integrated the potential action of their co-actor in their own action planning. Compared to the single-actor task, increased parietal and precentral activity during complementary tasks as shown in the fMRI data further suggested representation of the co-actor’s response. The superior frontal gyrus of the medial prefrontal cortex was differentially activated in the human co-actor condition compared to the computer co-actor condition. The medial prefrontal cortex, involved thinking about the beliefs and intentions of other people, possibly reflects a social-cognitive aspect or self-other discrimination during the joint task when believing a biological co-actor is present. Our results suggest that action co-representation can occur even offline with any agent type given a priori information that they are co-acting, however, additional regions are recruited when participants believe they are task-sharing with another human.

Original languageEnglish
Article number483
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Volume9
Issue numberseptember
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Sep 1

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Prefrontal Cortex
Neuroimaging
Joints
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Action Potentials
Reaction Time

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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Neuroimaging of the joint Simon effect with believed biological and non-biological co-actors. / Wen, Tanya; Hsieh, ShuLan.

In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, Vol. 9, No. september, 483, 01.09.2015, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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