Numerical analysis and experiments of capillarity-driven microfluid chip

C. K. Chang, C. C. Lai, Chen-Kuei Chung

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Pumping of fluid is an important issue in the microfluidic system. Surface-directed capillary pump merits no external power input and low pressure drop in the microchannel compared to external syringe pump and built-in powered pumps. In this article, the numerical analysis and experiments of the capillarity-driven fluidic flow in the microchannel have been investigated. Varied width-to-depth-ratio microchannels were designed for simulation and experiments. The surface hydrophilicity of PDMS and glass materials was examined for fluidic chip fabrication and flow test. Low-viscosity DI water and high-viscosity human blood were used for capillarity-driven flow measurement. PDMS surface was first performed by oxygen plasma treatment for hydrophilic surface to enhance capillary force. But the hydrophobic recovery of PDMS occurred several ten minutes after oxygen plasma treatment. So, the intrinsic hydrophilic glass chips were used for high-viscosity human blood test. The flow velocity of fluid was relevant to the channel geometry and fluidic viscosity. It increased with width-to-depth ratio at constant channel depth and decreased with viscosity. The experimental results had a good agreement with simulation. It offered a good reference for future capillarity-driven microfluidic device in biomedical or biochemical application.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNEMS 2011 - 6th IEEE International Conference on Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems
Pages1032-1035
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Event6th IEEE International Conference on Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems, NEMS 2011 - Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Duration: 2011 Feb 202011 Feb 23

Other

Other6th IEEE International Conference on Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems, NEMS 2011
CountryTaiwan
CityKaohsiung
Period11-02-2011-02-23

Fingerprint

numerical analysis
chips
viscosity
fluidics
microchannels
oxygen plasma
pumps
blood
syringes
glass
microfluidic devices
fluids
flow measurement
pressure drop
pumping
low pressure
simulation
flow velocity
recovery
fabrication

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Chang, C. K., Lai, C. C., & Chung, C-K. (2011). Numerical analysis and experiments of capillarity-driven microfluid chip. In NEMS 2011 - 6th IEEE International Conference on Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems (pp. 1032-1035). [6017532] https://doi.org/10.1109/NEMS.2011.6017532
Chang, C. K. ; Lai, C. C. ; Chung, Chen-Kuei. / Numerical analysis and experiments of capillarity-driven microfluid chip. NEMS 2011 - 6th IEEE International Conference on Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems. 2011. pp. 1032-1035
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Chang, CK, Lai, CC & Chung, C-K 2011, Numerical analysis and experiments of capillarity-driven microfluid chip. in NEMS 2011 - 6th IEEE International Conference on Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems., 6017532, pp. 1032-1035, 6th IEEE International Conference on Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems, NEMS 2011, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, 11-02-20. https://doi.org/10.1109/NEMS.2011.6017532

Numerical analysis and experiments of capillarity-driven microfluid chip. / Chang, C. K.; Lai, C. C.; Chung, Chen-Kuei.

NEMS 2011 - 6th IEEE International Conference on Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems. 2011. p. 1032-1035 6017532.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AB - Pumping of fluid is an important issue in the microfluidic system. Surface-directed capillary pump merits no external power input and low pressure drop in the microchannel compared to external syringe pump and built-in powered pumps. In this article, the numerical analysis and experiments of the capillarity-driven fluidic flow in the microchannel have been investigated. Varied width-to-depth-ratio microchannels were designed for simulation and experiments. The surface hydrophilicity of PDMS and glass materials was examined for fluidic chip fabrication and flow test. Low-viscosity DI water and high-viscosity human blood were used for capillarity-driven flow measurement. PDMS surface was first performed by oxygen plasma treatment for hydrophilic surface to enhance capillary force. But the hydrophobic recovery of PDMS occurred several ten minutes after oxygen plasma treatment. So, the intrinsic hydrophilic glass chips were used for high-viscosity human blood test. The flow velocity of fluid was relevant to the channel geometry and fluidic viscosity. It increased with width-to-depth ratio at constant channel depth and decreased with viscosity. The experimental results had a good agreement with simulation. It offered a good reference for future capillarity-driven microfluidic device in biomedical or biochemical application.

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Chang CK, Lai CC, Chung C-K. Numerical analysis and experiments of capillarity-driven microfluid chip. In NEMS 2011 - 6th IEEE International Conference on Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems. 2011. p. 1032-1035. 6017532 https://doi.org/10.1109/NEMS.2011.6017532