Observation of the nocturnal variation of ozone reservoir layers in southern Taiwan

Ching Ho Lin, Chin Hsing Lai, Yee Lin Wu, Ming Jen Chen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Southern Taiwan is suffering from O3 pollution due to intensive heavy industries and petroleum refineries there. The characteristics of O3 reservoir layers in Southern Taiwan were studied. The observed evolutions of O3 reservoir layers were divided into two stages. In the first stage, from evening to midnight, a deepened ozone reservoir layer initially formed from just above the ground to an altitude of 1000-1300 m. Then large decrease in O3 concentration occurred below 600-800 m from evening to midnight. As a result, a concentrated, elevated O3 reservoir layer formed at 800-1200 m by midnight. In the second stage, from midnight to next morning, the elevated O3 reservoir layer gradually decreased, finally reaching 500-900 m in the next mid-morning. Local circulations and nocturnal subsidence were responsible for the observed evolution. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 103rd AWMA Annual Conference and Exhibition (Calgary, Alberta, Canada 6/22-25/2010).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication103rd Air and Waste Management Association Annual Conference and Exhibition 2010 - Manuscripts/Extended Abstracts
Pages6702-6705
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Dec 1
Event103rd Air and Waste Management Association Annual Conference and Exhibition 2010 - Calgary, AB, Canada
Duration: 2010 Jun 222010 Jun 25

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA
Volume8
ISSN (Print)1052-6102

Other

Other103rd Air and Waste Management Association Annual Conference and Exhibition 2010
CountryCanada
CityCalgary, AB
Period10-06-2210-06-25

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Energy(all)

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