Paclitaxel-loaded poly(γ-glutamic acid)-poly(lactide) nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system against cultured HepG2 cells

Hsiang Fa Liang, Sung Ching Chen, Mei Chin Chen, Po Wei Lee, Chiung Tong Chen, Hsing Wen Sung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The study was to develop paclitaxel-loaded formulations using a novel type of self-assembled nanoparticles that was composed of block copolymers synthesized from poly(γ-glutamic acid) and poly(lactide) via a simple coupling reaction. The nanoparticles (the NPs) were prepared with various feed weight ratios of paclitaxel to block copolymer (the P/BC ratio). The morphology of all prepared nanoparticles was spherical and the surfaces were smooth. Increasing the P/BC ratio significantly increased the drug loading content of the prepared nanoparticles, but remarkably reduced the drug loading efficiency. The release rate of paclitaxel from the NPs decreased significantly as the P/BC ratio increased. For the potential of targeting liver cancer cells, galactosamine was further conjugated on the prepared nanoparticles (the Gal-NPs) as a targeting moiety. It was found that the activity in inhibiting the growth of HepG2 cells (a liver cancer cell line) by the Gal-NPs was comparable to that of a clinically available paclitaxel formulation, while the NPs displayed a significantly less activity. This may be attributed to the fact that the Gal-NPs had a specific interaction with HepG2 cells via ligand-receptor recognition. Cells treated with distinct paclitaxel formulations resulted in arrest in the G2/M phase. The arrest of cells in the G2/M phase was highly suggestive of interference by paclitaxel with spindle formation and was consistent with the morphological findings presented herein. In conclusion, the active targeting nature of the Gal-NPs prepared in the study may be used as a potential drug delivery system for the targeted delivery to liver cancers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-299
Number of pages9
JournalBioconjugate Chemistry
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Mar 1

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Hep G2 Cells
Drug Delivery Systems
Paclitaxel
Nanoparticles
Glutamic Acid
Cultured Cells
Acids
Liver Neoplasms
Liver
G2 Phase
Cell Division
Block copolymers
Galactosamine
Cells
poly(lactide)
Targeted drug delivery
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Ligands
Weights and Measures
Cell Line

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

Liang, Hsiang Fa ; Chen, Sung Ching ; Chen, Mei Chin ; Lee, Po Wei ; Chen, Chiung Tong ; Sung, Hsing Wen. / Paclitaxel-loaded poly(γ-glutamic acid)-poly(lactide) nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system against cultured HepG2 cells. In: Bioconjugate Chemistry. 2006 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 291-299.
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Paclitaxel-loaded poly(γ-glutamic acid)-poly(lactide) nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system against cultured HepG2 cells. / Liang, Hsiang Fa; Chen, Sung Ching; Chen, Mei Chin; Lee, Po Wei; Chen, Chiung Tong; Sung, Hsing Wen.

In: Bioconjugate Chemistry, Vol. 17, No. 2, 01.03.2006, p. 291-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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