Personality and emotional response in schizophrenics with persistent auditory hallucination

F. W. Lung, Bih-Ching Shu, P. F. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Personality has been proposed as having a possible effect on the reaction that patients have toward auditory hallucination. However, this factor has not been studied previously. Thus, this study investigated the relationship among demographics, personality, cognition and emotional response in schizophrenics with persistent auditory hallucination. One-hundred and fourteen subjects with persistent auditory hallucination completed the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, the revised Beliefs about Voices Questionnaire and the Chinese-version Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Structural equation model showed that personality had an effect on beliefs about the hallucination (malevolent or benevolent), which then affected the reaction of patients toward these voices (engages or resists). Their reaction will further affect the anxious or depressed state of the patients. When these hallucinations were categorized into the three levels of omnipotence, beliefs and reactions, the model was more significant than that of one-level model. Persistent auditory hallucination only accounted for a portion of the emotional distress when malevolent or benevolent voices were perceived, and personality characteristics accounted for the remaining emotional distress in schizophrenics. This model helped us understand the relationship between personality, cognition and affective symptoms, such that, when therapists decide what "trait" to change, they can determine at which point to intervene.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)470-475
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Psychiatry
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Oct 1

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Hallucinations
Personality
Cognition
Affective Symptoms
Structural Models
Anxiety
Demography
Depression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Personality and emotional response in schizophrenics with persistent auditory hallucination. / Lung, F. W.; Shu, Bih-Ching; Chen, P. F.

In: European Psychiatry, Vol. 24, No. 7, 01.10.2009, p. 470-475.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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