Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution

Catherine Martel, Junjie Yao, Chih-Hsien Huang, Jun Zou, Gwendalyn J. Randolph, Lihong V. Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

Original languageEnglish
Article number116009
JournalJournal of Biomedical Optics
Volume19
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Nov 1

Fingerprint

Photoacoustic effect
Photoacoustic microscopy
temporal resolution
photoacoustic microscopy
spatial resolution
Scanning
Imaging techniques
scanning
vessels
lymph
egress
animal models
high resolution
blood vessels
Blood vessels
imaging techniques
microelectromechanical systems
MEMS
field of view
Mirrors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Martel, Catherine ; Yao, Junjie ; Huang, Chih-Hsien ; Zou, Jun ; Randolph, Gwendalyn J. ; Wang, Lihong V. / Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution. In: Journal of Biomedical Optics. 2014 ; Vol. 19, No. 11.
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Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution. / Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Wang, Lihong V.

In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, Vol. 19, No. 11, 116009, 01.11.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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