Potential risk of consuming vegetables planted in soil with lead and cadmium and the influence on vegetable antioxidant activity

Wen Lii Huang, Wei Hsiang Chang, Shu Fen Cheng, Huai Yuan Li, Hsiu Ling Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Once in soil and water, metals can enter the food chain, and the consumption of contaminated crops can pose a serious risk to human health. This study used pot experiments to evaluate the accumulation of metal elements and their influence on levels of antioxidants in vegetables. The current study clearly demonstrates that metals accumulated in the five vegetables that were planted in the contaminated soils, especially so for water spinach. Cd accumulation of all of the vegetables planted in the contaminated soils was greater Cu. The low accumulation rate that was seen in sweet potato leaf, potato, and tomato indicated their suitability for planting in suspected contaminated soil, such as at farms nearby metal industries, in replacement of high accumulators, such as leafy vegetables. The non-carcinogenic HI of Cd exposure from water spinach and sweet potato were >1, whereas those for Cu were <1. This study suggests that residents may experience health risks due to vegetable consumption, and that children are vulnerable to the adverse effects of heavy metal ingestion.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3761
JournalApplied Sciences (Switzerland)
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 May 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Instrumentation
  • Engineering(all)
  • Process Chemistry and Technology
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes

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