Predicting skipjack tuna fishing grounds in the western and central pacific ocean based on high‐spatial– temporal‐resolution satellite data

Tung Yao Hsu, Yi Chang, Ming An Lee, Ren Fen Wu, Shih Chun Hsiao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Skipjack tuna are the most abundant commercial species in Taiwan’s pelagic purse seine fisheries. However, the rapidly changing marine environment increases the challenge of locating target fish in the vast ocean. The aim of this study was to identify the potential fishing grounds of skipjack tuna in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO). The fishing grounds of skipjack tuna were simulated using the habitat suitability index (HSI) on the basis of global fishing activities and remote sensing data from 2012 to 2015. The selected environmental factors included sea surface temperature and front, sea surface height, sea surface salinity, mixed layer depth, chlorophyll a concentration, and finite‐size Lyapunov exponents. The final input factors were selected according to their percentage contribution to the total efforts. Overall, 68.3% of global datasets and 35.7% of Taiwanese logbooks’ fishing spots were recorded within 5 km of suitable habitat in the daily field. Moreover, 94.9% and 79.6% of global and Taiwan data, respectively, were identified within 50 km of suitable habitat. Our results showed that the model performed well in fitting daily forecast and actual fishing position data. Further, results from this study could benefit habitat monitoring and contribute to managing sustainable fisheries for skipjack tuna by providing wide spatial coverage information on habitat variation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number861
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalRemote Sensing
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Mar 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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