Prediction of lower extremity motor recovery in persons with severe lower extremity paresis after stroke

Sheau Ling Huang, Bang Bin Chen, I. Ping Hsueh, Jiann Shing Jeng, Chia Lin Koh, Ching Lin Hsieh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the extent of motor recovery and predict the prognosis of lower extremity (LE) recovery in patients with severe LE paresis after stroke Methods: 137 patients with severe LE paresis after stroke were recruited from a local medical centre. Voluntary LE movement was assessed with the LE subscale of the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement (STREAM-LE). Univariate and stepwise regression analyses were used to investigate 25 clinical variables (including demographic, neuroimaging, and behavioural variables) for finding the predictors of LE recovery. Results: The STREAM-LE at discharge (DCSTREAM-LE) of the participants covered a very wide range (0–19). Specifically, 5.1% of the participants were nearly completely recovered, 11.7% were moderately recovered, 36.5% were slightly recovered, and 46.7% remained severely paralysed. ‘Score of STREAM-LE at admission (ADSTREAM-LE)’ and ‘volume of lesion and oedema’) were significant predictors of LE movement at discharge, explaining 25.1% of the variance of the DCSTREAM-LE (p < 0.001). Conclusions: LE motor recovery varied widely in our participants, indicating that patients’ recovery might not follow simple rules. The low predictive power (about a quarter) indicates that LE motor recovery in patients with severe LE paresis after stroke was hardly predictive.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)627-633
Number of pages7
JournalBrain Injury
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Apr 16

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

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