Predictors of Health Status in Mothers of Premature Infants with Implications for Clinical Practice and Future Research

Chia Yao Wu, Chich Hsiu Hung, Ying-Ju Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Postpartum health research has focused primarily on full-term mothers. Aims: To explore postpartum stress, depression, social support, health status, and predictors of health status in mothers of premature infants. Methods: This study employed a cross-sectional design. With convenience sampling, a total of 203 mothers of premature infants were recruited from two medical centers and four community teaching hospitals in southern Taiwan. The Hung Postpartum Stress Scale, Social Support Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Chinese Health Questionnaire were used to assess the mothers' psychosocial features during the first 6 weeks postpartum. Results: Mothers' health status differed significantly according to levels of postpartum stress and depression. The important health status predictors were age, education, postpartum stress, and depression level. Discussion: The concerns and needs of mothers of premature infants differed from those of full-term mothers during the first 6 weeks postpartum; premature infants' health status was found to be a major perceived stressor for their mothers. Linking Evidence to Action: In the process of caring for premature infants' mothers, healthcare providers should provide individualized care to meet their needs, thus facilitating the reduction of postpartum stress and depression levels. During premature infants' hospitalizations, healthcare providers should hold regular faculty meetings to provide postpartum women with relevant information about their infants' health and how to best care for them. Future studies should explore postpartum stress, social support, depression, and health status each postpartum week, which could serve as a guide for nursing interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-227
Number of pages11
JournalWorldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Aug 1

Fingerprint

Premature Infants
Health Status
Mothers
Postpartum Period
Postpartum Depression
Social Support
Health Personnel
Depression
Community Hospital
Health
Taiwan
Teaching Hospitals
Hospitalization
Nursing
Education
Equipment and Supplies
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

@article{d6f9f5ee63bd4f21a11563bd9585fb17,
title = "Predictors of Health Status in Mothers of Premature Infants with Implications for Clinical Practice and Future Research",
abstract = "Background: Postpartum health research has focused primarily on full-term mothers. Aims: To explore postpartum stress, depression, social support, health status, and predictors of health status in mothers of premature infants. Methods: This study employed a cross-sectional design. With convenience sampling, a total of 203 mothers of premature infants were recruited from two medical centers and four community teaching hospitals in southern Taiwan. The Hung Postpartum Stress Scale, Social Support Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Chinese Health Questionnaire were used to assess the mothers' psychosocial features during the first 6 weeks postpartum. Results: Mothers' health status differed significantly according to levels of postpartum stress and depression. The important health status predictors were age, education, postpartum stress, and depression level. Discussion: The concerns and needs of mothers of premature infants differed from those of full-term mothers during the first 6 weeks postpartum; premature infants' health status was found to be a major perceived stressor for their mothers. Linking Evidence to Action: In the process of caring for premature infants' mothers, healthcare providers should provide individualized care to meet their needs, thus facilitating the reduction of postpartum stress and depression levels. During premature infants' hospitalizations, healthcare providers should hold regular faculty meetings to provide postpartum women with relevant information about their infants' health and how to best care for them. Future studies should explore postpartum stress, social support, depression, and health status each postpartum week, which could serve as a guide for nursing interventions.",
author = "Wu, {Chia Yao} and Hung, {Chich Hsiu} and Ying-Ju Chang",
year = "2015",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/wvn.12101",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "217--227",
journal = "Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing",
issn = "1545-102X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

Predictors of Health Status in Mothers of Premature Infants with Implications for Clinical Practice and Future Research. / Wu, Chia Yao; Hung, Chich Hsiu; Chang, Ying-Ju.

In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, Vol. 12, No. 4, 01.08.2015, p. 217-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictors of Health Status in Mothers of Premature Infants with Implications for Clinical Practice and Future Research

AU - Wu, Chia Yao

AU - Hung, Chich Hsiu

AU - Chang, Ying-Ju

PY - 2015/8/1

Y1 - 2015/8/1

N2 - Background: Postpartum health research has focused primarily on full-term mothers. Aims: To explore postpartum stress, depression, social support, health status, and predictors of health status in mothers of premature infants. Methods: This study employed a cross-sectional design. With convenience sampling, a total of 203 mothers of premature infants were recruited from two medical centers and four community teaching hospitals in southern Taiwan. The Hung Postpartum Stress Scale, Social Support Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Chinese Health Questionnaire were used to assess the mothers' psychosocial features during the first 6 weeks postpartum. Results: Mothers' health status differed significantly according to levels of postpartum stress and depression. The important health status predictors were age, education, postpartum stress, and depression level. Discussion: The concerns and needs of mothers of premature infants differed from those of full-term mothers during the first 6 weeks postpartum; premature infants' health status was found to be a major perceived stressor for their mothers. Linking Evidence to Action: In the process of caring for premature infants' mothers, healthcare providers should provide individualized care to meet their needs, thus facilitating the reduction of postpartum stress and depression levels. During premature infants' hospitalizations, healthcare providers should hold regular faculty meetings to provide postpartum women with relevant information about their infants' health and how to best care for them. Future studies should explore postpartum stress, social support, depression, and health status each postpartum week, which could serve as a guide for nursing interventions.

AB - Background: Postpartum health research has focused primarily on full-term mothers. Aims: To explore postpartum stress, depression, social support, health status, and predictors of health status in mothers of premature infants. Methods: This study employed a cross-sectional design. With convenience sampling, a total of 203 mothers of premature infants were recruited from two medical centers and four community teaching hospitals in southern Taiwan. The Hung Postpartum Stress Scale, Social Support Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Chinese Health Questionnaire were used to assess the mothers' psychosocial features during the first 6 weeks postpartum. Results: Mothers' health status differed significantly according to levels of postpartum stress and depression. The important health status predictors were age, education, postpartum stress, and depression level. Discussion: The concerns and needs of mothers of premature infants differed from those of full-term mothers during the first 6 weeks postpartum; premature infants' health status was found to be a major perceived stressor for their mothers. Linking Evidence to Action: In the process of caring for premature infants' mothers, healthcare providers should provide individualized care to meet their needs, thus facilitating the reduction of postpartum stress and depression levels. During premature infants' hospitalizations, healthcare providers should hold regular faculty meetings to provide postpartum women with relevant information about their infants' health and how to best care for them. Future studies should explore postpartum stress, social support, depression, and health status each postpartum week, which could serve as a guide for nursing interventions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84938578331&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84938578331&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/wvn.12101

DO - 10.1111/wvn.12101

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 217

EP - 227

JO - Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing

JF - Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing

SN - 1545-102X

IS - 4

ER -