Prevalence and associated factors for metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese Hospital employees

Hsueh Hua Ho, Tzung Yi Tsai, Ching Ling Lin, Shu Yuan Wu, Chung-Yi Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome (MS) is most important because of its association with subsequent development of cardiovascular diseases. However, few studies about the prevalence of MS among hospital employees had been published.The aims of our study were to examine the prevalence of MS and associated factors. The up-to-date health examination data of 1,400 hospital employees of a medical center in North Taiwan were included, and MS was defined according to the criteria that were promulgated by the National Department of Health. The overall prevalence of MS was 10.3% (21.8% males, 7.0% females). Associated factors included male gender, aging, low education, administrative employees, abnormal hemoglobin concentration, and abnormal liver function indexes. According to our study, the prevalence of MS in hospital employees was lower than the general population, and the findings could be a reference to make more efficient health-promotion programs to lower the prevalence of MS in hospital employees.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)307-314
Number of pages8
JournalAsia-Pacific Journal of Public Health
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 May 1

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Cross-Sectional Studies
Abnormal Hemoglobins
Health
Health Promotion
Taiwan
Cardiovascular Diseases
Education
Liver
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Ho, Hsueh Hua ; Tsai, Tzung Yi ; Lin, Ching Ling ; Wu, Shu Yuan ; Li, Chung-Yi. / Prevalence and associated factors for metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese Hospital employees. In: Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health. 2011 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 307-314.
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Prevalence and associated factors for metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese Hospital employees. / Ho, Hsueh Hua; Tsai, Tzung Yi; Lin, Ching Ling; Wu, Shu Yuan; Li, Chung-Yi.

In: Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.05.2011, p. 307-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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